West African Dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis)

- Image ID: BGCM06
West African Dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis)
Élan Images / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: BGCM06
West African dwarf crocodile Scientific name: Osteolaemus tetraspis Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierre Leone, Togo Continent: Africa Diet: Fish- piscivore, frogs- ranivore, crustaceans- crustacivore. In the Zoo, they are given fish, rats or mice which are already dead, and live locusts. All food items are swallowed whole. Food & feeding: Carnivore Habitats: Freshwater, tropical rainforest, tropical grassland Conservation status: Vulnerable Relatives: Nile crocodile, caiman Description: The dwarf crocodile is the world's smallest crocodile, growing up to 190 cm in length (by contrast, the Nile crocodile can reach 5 m in length). It is found alone or in pairs in burrows near the water's edge. As with all crocodiles, their impressive jaws are designed to close on prey with maximum force, but they cannot chew or bite pieces off their prey. Lifestyle: They remain in their burrows during the day, coming out at night to hunt in the water, along the banks of the river or pool and into the forest. During the dry season (for those living in savanna areas) they may spend longer period within the burrow. Family & friends: Perhaps surprisingly, crocodiles are good mothers, building and guarding nests and escorting the hatchlings. Keeping in touch: Baby crocodiles near hatching call to their mother from within the nest with a curious twanging note. Growing up: When the female is ready to lay eggs, a nest of rotting vegetation is built by dragging leaves into a pile, which breaks down like a compost heap, keeping the eggs warm. The female breeds once a year, laying up to 20 ( more usually about 10) eggs. The incubation period lasts 85-105 days. The female guards the nest and escorts the newly hatched young in the water. Some of the young may stay with the mother for a few weeks