tiger hunting elephants Humans are the tiger's most significant predator, as tigers are often poached illegally for their fur.

- Image ID: B7PWDR
tiger hunting elephants Humans are the tiger's most significant predator, as tigers are often poached illegally for their fur.
19th era / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B7PWDR
Humans are the tiger's most significant predator, as tigers are often poached illegally for their fur. The Bengal Tiger is the most common subspecies of tiger, constituting approximately 80% of the entire tiger population, and is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal, and India and has been hunted in those countries for centuries. Tiger has historically been a popular big game animal and has been hunted for prestige as well as for taking trophies. Poaching continues extensively even after such hunting became illegal and legal protection was provided to the Tiger. Now an conservation reliant endangered species, the majority of the world's tigers now live in captivity. Tigers were once considered to be harder to hunt than lions, due to their habit of living alone in dense cover and not noisily asserting their presence with roars as often In the past, tigers have been hunted on foot, horseback, elephant-back and from machans. Any of these involved considerable danger and the hunting of a tiger has always been considered a manly and courageous feat with game trophies being collected as symbols of valor and prestige. While the tiger was widely extant and not threatened right up to the first decades of the twentieth century, hunting and habitat loss reduced its population in India from 40,000 to less than 1,800 in a mere hundred years. Despite the prevalence of tiger hunting as a royal sport for centuries, the consequences were larger during the British Raj due to the use of far superior fire power and an interest to hunt shared by a much larger number of colonial aristocrats.