The Three Kings Tea Rooms Chester City, Cheshire, England, UK

- Image ID: ECW4F2
Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: ECW4F2
located within the Roman Walls of this Historic City of Chester. The Three Kings Tea Rooms are housed in a 'Grade Two' Listed Building which dates from the mid 17th Century. The building is constructed around a massive inner oak frame which incorporates a thirty foot cross beam and vertical house tree over eighteen feet six inches high. Throughout the premises the timber frames and roof trusses are exposed with many of the panels retaining their original 'wattle and daub' infill. One of the Stairwell timbers has recently been dated as early 12th Century making it the oldest, to date, located in Chester. The Building was originally thought to have been the Tithe Store of the Earl of Shrewsbury who at one time owned the entire block in which this property stands. He held the title of 'Sergeant of Bridgegate' with the right to take a toll from carts using the Old Dee Bridge, the toll being three coins of the period, which bore the Kings Head, hence the buildings present name. A recent survey suggests that Chester's famous 'Rows' might have extended to this part of the City, but the earliest documented evidence is an engraving by Bateman of 1816 showing the property with twin gables. Over the door is a sign which reads 'Dealers in Tea and Coffee'. The Georgian facade was added at the beginning of the 19th Century after which it was sold by the Shrewsbury Estate under the 'Act of 1862'. Since then the building has been put to various uses from a Private Dwelling to a Wine Merchants, Refreshment Rooms, Bespoke Tailors and now, rather appropriately as 'The Three Kings Tea Rooms'.
Location: 90 - 92 Lower Bridge Street, Chester, England, UK CH1 1RU