The great cemetery at woking general view April 26 1856 The Illustrated London News Page 464

- Image ID: B5J9TH
The great cemetery at woking general view April 26 1856 The Illustrated London News Page 464 Stock Photo
Enlarge
https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1 https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-the-great-cemetery-at-woking-general-view-april-26-1856-the-illustrated-20686529.html
The great cemetery at woking general view April 26 1856 The Illustrated London News Page 464
Alan King engraving / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B5J9TH
developed by the London Necropolis Company as an overflow burial ground for London's deadBy the mid-nineteenth century the volume of London's dead was causing considerable public concern. In 1850, the idea of a great metropolitan cemetery, situated in the suburbs and large enough to contain all of London's dead for ever, was promoted. In 1850 an interested group formed the London Necropolis & National Mausoleum Company, established by Act of Parliament in June 1852 2,000 acres of Woking's common land was purchased from Lord Onslow. Some 500 acres were initially planted out for the Cemetery at the western end of this estate. As Brookwood could be reached cheaply and conveniently only by railway, the London & South Western Railway was engaged to convey coffins and mourners from a private station adjacent to Waterloo down into the Cemetery. At Brookwood there were two stations, one for the Nonconformist sections, the other for the Anglican areas. Brookwood Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Winchester on 7 November 1854 and opened to the public on 13 November 1854. In 1854, was the largest Cemetery in the world. Today this is no longer true, but it remains the largest Cemetery in the UK, and is probably the biggest in Western Europe. Since 1854, some 235,000 people have been buried there. Plots were reserved for use by parishes (eg: St Anne's Soho), or by various guilds and organisations (eg: the Oddfellows' Society). Individuals had complete freedom over the site and position of their grave, provided they could afford the plot. The cemetery includes a remarkably rich range of burials reflecting all levels of society. Famous burials include those of Charles Bradlaugh (the first atheist to sit in the House of Commons); Dr Robert Knox (one of Burke and Hare's best customers); the artists John Singer Sargent, William and Evelyn De Morgan; and the locomotive engineer Dugald Drummond. Other burials include those of Mrs Edith Thompson (executed a