The Forth Rail Bridge and Forth Road Bridge crossings over the Firth River at night. South Queensferry, Edinburgh, Scotland

- Image ID: J2CF2G
The Forth Rail Bridge and Forth Road Bridge crossings over the Firth River at night. South Queensferry, Edinburgh, Stock Photo
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The Forth Rail Bridge and Forth Road Bridge crossings over the Firth River at night. South Queensferry, Edinburgh, Scotland
James Kinsman / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: J2CF2G
The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge that spans the Firth of Forth between the villages of South Queensferry and North Queensferry in the east of Scotland, 9 miles west of Edinburgh City Centre. It is considered an iconic structure, a symbol of Scotland and a UNESCO World Heritage Site as of 2015. It was designed by the English engineers Sir John Fowler and Sir Benjamin Baker. It is sometimes referred to as the Forth Rail Bridge to distinguish it from the Forth Road Bridge, though this has never been its official name. It has a total length of 8,094 feet (2,467 m). Construction of the bridge began in 1882 and it was opened on 4 March 1890 by the Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII. When it opened it was the longest single cantilever bridge in the world, until 1919 when the Quebec Bridge in Canada was completed. It continues to be the world's second-longest single cantilever.
Location: Forth Bridge, United Kingdom