The crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata), with its quills raised in a defensive posture.

- Image ID: F3WMBK
The crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata), with its quills raised in a defensive posture.
John Gaffen / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: F3WMBK
The crested porcupine is a terrestrial mammal; they very seldom climb trees, but can swim. They are nocturnal and monogamous. The crested porcupine takes care of the young for a long time and small family groups consist of the adult pair and young of various ages. In defense, when disturbed, they raise and fan their quills to make themselves look bigger. If continually bothered, the crested porcupine will stamp its feet, whirr the quills, and charge the disturber back end first trying to stab the enemy with the thicker, shorter quills. These attacks are known to have killed lions, leopards, hyenas, and even humans. Crested porcupines have been known to collect thousands of bones that they find at night. They are mostly nocturnal, and they may wander upon the skeletons of many animals. These include prehistoric animals, such as Deinotherium[citation needed]. They will collect these bones, and store them in an underground chamber, or cave. Sometimes humans dig up these bones, it is an amazing find for paleontologists and archaeologists.
Location: Wingham Wildlife Park 2008 Ltd, Rusham Road, Wingham, Kent, CT3 1JL.

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