Sunset Ceremony in Episkopi. Pictured are personnel from Episkopi Garrison in Cyprus lowering the Union Jack on the Episkopi cliffs as part of Remembrance Day events. The Sunset Ceremony is a combination of three ceremonies: the ancient ceremony of Beating Retreat, Tattoo, and lowering of the national flag. Beating Retreat was the practice of ceasing fighting at dusk and resuming at dawn, and the warriors were called back to camp by a roll of the drums. Later, when the drums became confused with the sound of gunfire, bugles were added. In larger towns with permanent garrisons, the drummers

- Image ID: M86FDH
Sunset Ceremony in Episkopi. Pictured are personnel from Episkopi Garrison in Cyprus lowering the Union Jack on the Episkopi cliffs as part of Remembrance Day events. The Sunset Ceremony is a combination of three ceremonies: the ancient ceremony of Beating Retreat, Tattoo, and lowering of the national flag. Beating Retreat was the practice of ceasing fighting at dusk and resuming at dawn, and the warriors were called back to camp by a roll of the drums. Later, when the drums became confused with the sound of gunfire, bugles were added. In larger towns with permanent garrisons, the drummers
Aero Archive / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: M86FDH
Sunset Ceremony in Episkopi. Pictured are personnel from Episkopi Garrison in Cyprus lowering the Union Jack on the Episkopi cliffs as part of Remembrance Day events. The Sunset Ceremony is a combination of three ceremonies: the ancient ceremony of Beating Retreat, Tattoo, and lowering of the national flag. Beating Retreat was the practice of ceasing fighting at dusk and resuming at dawn, and the warriors were called back to camp by a roll of the drums. Later, when the drums became confused with the sound of gunfire, bugles were added. In larger towns with permanent garrisons, the drummers were sent through the streets to remind those on leave of absence to return to their quarters. As the drummers passed inns and bars, the publicans closed them for the night. Often the bands played entertainment tunes, and an evening hymn: this became known as Tattoo: from the Flemish words “doe den tap toe” meaning close the taps. Following the Retreat and the Tattoo, the garrison was mustered and the night guard was mounted. Before sentries were posted, they fired or proved their muskets to ensure they were in good condition. At sunset, a call was sounded, to summon the guard for the night to ensure the town was fortified. The lowering of the National flag took place at sunset following the bugler calls announcing the “First” and “Last” post.