Stigma of African violet (saintpaulia) flower, scanning electron microscopy

- Image ID: D5GHH4
Heiti Paves / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: D5GHH4
Stigma is the receptive tip of a carpel, or of several fused carpels, in the gynoecium of a flower. The stigma receives pollen at pollination and it is on the stigma that the pollen grain germinates. The stigma is adapted to catch and trap pollen with various hairs, flaps, or sculpturings. The pollen may be captured from the air (wind-borne pollen, anemophily), from visiting insects or other animals (biotic pollination), or in rare cases from surrounding water (hydrophily). Stigmas can vary from long and slender to globe shaped to feathery. Pollen is typically highly desiccated when it leaves an anther. Stigmas have been shown to assist in the rehydration of pollen and in promoting germination of the pollen tube. Stigmas also ensure proper adhesion of the correct species of pollen. Stigmas can play an active role in pollen discrimination and some self-incompatibility reactions, that reject pollen from the same or genetically similar plants, involve interaction between the stigma and the surface of the pollen grain.
Location: Tallinn, Estonia