Small monument with daffodils at old renaissance period house in berkshire, england near Henley-on-Thames

- Image ID: C63AKD
Small monument with daffodils at old renaissance period house in berkshire, england near Henley-on-Thames Stock Photo
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Small monument with daffodils at old renaissance period house in berkshire, england near Henley-on-Thames
isabel hutchison / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: C63AKD
Park Place is situated a mile east of Henley-on-Thames in the village of Remenham. It is a Grade 11 listed building, built around 1719. Park Place has had some very famous and prominent owners The house was sold in 1738 to HRH Frederick Prince of Wales, the eldest son of George 11, who is reputed to be responsible for the planting of the three magnificent Cedar trees standing at the South of the house. Frederick died in 1751 and the estate, which totalled 900 acres, was sold by his wife, Augusta, in 1752 to General Henry Seymour Conway. From 1947-1988 it was used as a boarding school for children between the ages of 11-16, who suffered from Health or Emotional problems. The school catered for up to 65 boys at anyone time. It had a full complement of staff including, teachers, houseparents, nurse, cooks, domestics, caretaker and a visiting Doctor and Dentist. Despite several alterations, the present building was built in a French Renaissance style, and is set in beautiful landscaped gardens totalling 65 acres. It was recently used in the remake of the film St. Trinians.
Location: Park Place, Remenham, Henley-on-Thames, Berkshire, England, uk, United Kingdom