Shoo Shoo Baby is the name of a B-17 Flying Fortress in World War II, preserved and on public display at Wright Patterson AFB

- Image ID: DAN0MM
Shoo Shoo Baby is the name of a B-17 Flying Fortress in World War II, preserved and on public display at Wright Patterson AFB
David Davis Photoproductions / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: DAN0MM
Shoo Shoo Baby is the name of a B-17 Flying Fortress in World War II, preserved and on public display. A B-17G-35-BO, serial number 42-32076, and manufactured by Boeing, it was named by her crew for a song of the same name made popular by The Andrews Sisters, the favorite song of its crew chief T/Sgt. Hank Cordes. Photographs of the bomber indicate that a third "Shoo" was added to the name at some point in May 1944 when the original aircraft commander completed his tour of duty and was replaced by another pilot. The aircraft that would become Shoo Shoo Baby was accepted into the U.S. Army Air Forces inventory on January 19, 1944, and arrived in Great Britain on March 2. After depot modifications, it was flown to the 91st Bomb Group at RAF Bassingbourn on March 23 and began flying missions the next day. 2nd Lt. Paul C. McDuffee was the first pilot assigned to the aircraft and flew 14 of his 25 missions in it, but nine different crews flew Shoo Shoo Baby on missions. The B-17 flew 24 combat missions from England with the 91st BG, with three other missions aborted for mechanical problems, before being listed as missing in action on May 29, 1944. On its final mission, to the Focke Wulf aircraft component factory at Poznań, Poland, it crash-landed at Malmö Airport, Sweden.