Bus on which Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat in Montgomery in 1955, Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, Detroit, Michigan, USA
RMCTHR8TBus on which Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat in Montgomery in 1955, Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, Detroit, Michigan, USA
Rosa Parks, known for her stand against racial bus segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, speaking near the Washington Monument at The Poor People's March on Washington in Washington, D.C. on June 19, 1968.
RMTARRE3Rosa Parks, known for her stand against racial bus segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, speaking near the Washington Monument at The Poor People's March on Washington in Washington, D.C. on June 19, 1968.
Restored bus Rosa Parks sat in December 1, 1955 from Montgomery Alabama on Cleveland Avenue, is seen in  Washington, D.C. National Mall, for the 50th Anniversary of the march on Washington and Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream Speech
RMF7MHFGRestored bus Rosa Parks sat in December 1, 1955 from Montgomery Alabama on Cleveland Avenue, is seen in Washington, D.C. National Mall, for the 50th Anniversary of the march on Washington and Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream Speech
License Plate on Rosa Parks Bus
RMAY0NCELicense Plate on Rosa Parks Bus
A statue of civil rights activist Rosa Parks stands in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol after being unveiled February 27, 2013 in Washington, DC. Rosa Parks, whose arrest in 1955 for refusing to yield her seat on a segregated bus to a white passenger helped ignite the modern American civil rights movement. This bronze statue depicts Parks seated on a rock-like formation of which she seems almost a part, symbolizing her famous refusal to give up her bus seat. The statue is close to nine feet tall including its pedestal.
RMD406MBA statue of civil rights activist Rosa Parks stands in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol after being unveiled February 27, 2013 in Washington, DC. Rosa Parks, whose arrest in 1955 for refusing to yield her seat on a segregated bus to a white passenger helped ignite the modern American civil rights movement. This bronze statue depicts Parks seated on a rock-like formation of which she seems almost a part, symbolizing her famous refusal to give up her bus seat. The statue is close to nine feet tall including its pedestal.
Rosa Parks Mug Shot 1955. Arrested for refusing to relinquish her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama.
RM2A5YN23Rosa Parks Mug Shot 1955. Arrested for refusing to relinquish her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama.
File photo showing civil rights icon Rosa Parks at a ceremony where she was presented with the Congressional Gold Medal, on June 15, 1999. The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way December 8, 2003 for Parks to proceed with her lawsuit against OutKast and others over the rap music duo's hit song with her name as its title. The justices let stand a U.S. appeals court ruling that reinstated Parks' false advertising and publicity claims against OutKast and three Bertelsmann AG units. Parks made history in 1955 when she refused to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back of a city bus in
RM2D55B2HFile photo showing civil rights icon Rosa Parks at a ceremony where she was presented with the Congressional Gold Medal, on June 15, 1999. The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way December 8, 2003 for Parks to proceed with her lawsuit against OutKast and others over the rap music duo's hit song with her name as its title. The justices let stand a U.S. appeals court ruling that reinstated Parks' false advertising and publicity claims against OutKast and three Bertelsmann AG units. Parks made history in 1955 when she refused to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back of a city bus in
KRT US NEWS STORY SLUGGED: ROSAPARKSBUS KRT PHOTOGRAPH BY J. KYLE KEENER/DETROIT FREE PRESS (January 30) Justin Ray sits in the restored back seat of the historic Montgomery, Alabama, bus No. 2857, on which Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on December 1, 1955. The restoration of the bus is taking place in Auburn Hills, Michigan. (Photo by gsb) 2003 (Diversity)
RM2F1A1NXKRT US NEWS STORY SLUGGED: ROSAPARKSBUS KRT PHOTOGRAPH BY J. KYLE KEENER/DETROIT FREE PRESS (January 30) Justin Ray sits in the restored back seat of the historic Montgomery, Alabama, bus No. 2857, on which Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on December 1, 1955. The restoration of the bus is taking place in Auburn Hills, Michigan. (Photo by gsb) 2003 (Diversity)
A black ribbon placed on the front seat of a Detroit city bus honors civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks as bus riders leave the seat empty in Detroit, Michigan, October 27, 2005. Buses in Detroit and [Alabama] are honoring Parks by reserving the first seat of their buses as a tribute to her legacy until her funeral next week. Parks, the black woman who refused to yield her seat to a white man in 1955, died on Monday in Detroit at the age of 92. Parks is known as the mother of the modern U.S. civil rights movement.
RM2D1DBW8A black ribbon placed on the front seat of a Detroit city bus honors civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks as bus riders leave the seat empty in Detroit, Michigan, October 27, 2005. Buses in Detroit and [Alabama] are honoring Parks by reserving the first seat of their buses as a tribute to her legacy until her funeral next week. Parks, the black woman who refused to yield her seat to a white man in 1955, died on Monday in Detroit at the age of 92. Parks is known as the mother of the modern U.S. civil rights movement.
Mrs. Rosa Parks, 43, in a forward seat of a Montgomery, Alabama, bus on December 21, 1956. It was over a year earlier that the African American NAACP activist ignited off the Montgomery Bus Boycott on Dec. 1, 1955, by refusing to give her seat in the Negro section of the bus, to standing white passenger  (BSLOC 2020 2 86)
RM2BACCWPMrs. Rosa Parks, 43, in a forward seat of a Montgomery, Alabama, bus on December 21, 1956. It was over a year earlier that the African American NAACP activist ignited off the Montgomery Bus Boycott on Dec. 1, 1955, by refusing to give her seat in the Negro section of the bus, to standing white passenger (BSLOC 2020 2 86)
An officer helps Rosa Parks great nephew Schuyler McCauley Brown with his tie before the funeral service for Parks at the Metropolitan AME Church October 31, 2005 in Washington, DC. More than 30,000 people at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda passed by the casket of the woman who refused to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama city bus in 1955, sparking the American civil rights movement. (UPI Photo/Kamenko Pajic)
RMW0CTBKAn officer helps Rosa Parks great nephew Schuyler McCauley Brown with his tie before the funeral service for Parks at the Metropolitan AME Church October 31, 2005 in Washington, DC. More than 30,000 people at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda passed by the casket of the woman who refused to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama city bus in 1955, sparking the American civil rights movement. (UPI Photo/Kamenko Pajic)
Evoking Emotion through Art, an interactive display on Naval Hospital Bremerton’s Quarterdeck by Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class ViJorge Potal, represents Rosa Parks and her refusal to move to the back of the bus. Each chair is occupied by a silhouette, and within each silhouette is a collage of significant events that helped change the course of history during the Civil Rights Movement. A Viewer can take part and have a seat in the unoccupied chair. The simple act of participating simulates Parks when she refused to move in 1955.  The viewer is then asked to observe their immediate surroundings a
RMPEY42BEvoking Emotion through Art, an interactive display on Naval Hospital Bremerton’s Quarterdeck by Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class ViJorge Potal, represents Rosa Parks and her refusal to move to the back of the bus. Each chair is occupied by a silhouette, and within each silhouette is a collage of significant events that helped change the course of history during the Civil Rights Movement. A Viewer can take part and have a seat in the unoccupied chair. The simple act of participating simulates Parks when she refused to move in 1955. The viewer is then asked to observe their immediate surroundings a