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Resetting a watch for daylight saving time or British Summer Time BST by one hour in March and October.

Resetting a watch for daylight saving time or British Summer Time BST by one hour in March and October. Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

CEYABR

File size:

43.1 MB (1.4 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - yes | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

4752 x 3168 px | 40.2 x 26.8 cm | 15.8 x 10.6 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

25 October 2009

Location:

Manchester, North West England, UK

More information:

Resetting a watch for daylight saving time or British Summer Time BST by one hour in March and October. The current arrangement is now defined by the Summer Time Order 2002 which defines BST as ...the period beginning at one o'clock, Greenwich mean time, in the morning of the last Sunday in March and ending at one o'clock, Greenwich mean time, in the morning of the last Sunday in October. —The Summer Time Order 2002 This period was stipulated by a Directive (2000/84/EC) of the European Parliament which required European countries to implement a common summer time (as originally introduced in 1997, in Directive 97/44/EC). In part because of Britain's latitudinal length, debate emerges most years over the applicability of BST, and is the subject of parliamentary debate. In 2004, English MP Nigel Beard tabled a Private Member's Bill in the House of Commons proposing that England and Wales should be able to determine their own time independently of Scotland and Northern Ireland. If it had been passed into law, this bill could have given the United Kingdom two different timezones for the first time since the abolition of Dublin Mean Time (25 minutes behind Greenwich) on 23 August 1916.

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