Photochrome print c1890s of the old London Bridge over the River Thames designed by engineer John Rennie and opened in 1831.

- Image ID: BHTRNH
Archive Images / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: BHTRNH
Photochrome colour print circa 1890s of the old London Bridge over the River Thames designed by engineer John Rennie. The structure, comprising five granite arches, was built in the 1820s to replace the existing London Bridge which was over 600 years old. It opened in 1831 and was 928 feet (283m) long and 49 feet (15m) wide. By 1896 the Bridge was estimated to be the busiest point in London with 8,000 people crossing on foot and 900 crossing in vehicles every hour. The Bridge was sold by the City of London in the 1960s to a Missourian entrepreneur and taken apart and transported to Lake Havasu City in Arizona where it was re-built and remains today as a major tourist attraction. Photochrome prints were colourised images produced from black and white photograph negatives via the direct transfer of a negative onto lithographic printing plates. The process was most popular in the 1890s when true colour photography was in its infancy and still commercially impractical. This print is by the Detroit Photographic Company.