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Passenger train crossing the Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle to Carlisle line. Batty Moss, Ribblehead, North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom,

Passenger train crossing the Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle to Carlisle line. Batty Moss, Ribblehead, North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Stan Pritchard / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

HYM1KN

File size:

23.4 MB (1.9 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

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Dimensions:

3500 x 2336 px | 29.6 x 19.8 cm | 11.7 x 7.8 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

3 April 2017

Location:

Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle to Carlisle line. Batty Moss, Ribblehead, North Yorkshire, England,

More information:

The Ribblehead Viaduct or Batty Moss Viaduct carries the Settle-Carlisle Railway across Batty Moss in the valley of the River Ribble at Ribblehead, in North Yorkshire, England. The viaduct, built by the Midland Railway, is 28 miles (45 km) north-west of Skipton and 26 miles (42 km) south-east of Kendal. It is a Grade II* listed structure. The land underneath and around the viaduct is a scheduled ancient monument. The remains of the construction camp and navvy settlements (Batty Wife Hole, Sebastopol, and Belgravia) are located there. The viaduct was designed by engineer John Sydney Crossley. The first stone was laid on 12 October 1870 and the last in 1874. One thousand navvies built the viaduct and established shanty towns on the moors for themselves and their families. They named the towns after Crimean War victories, well-to-do districts of London and biblical names. There were smallpox epidemics and deaths from industrial accidents. Around one hundred navvies were killed during its construction. There are around 200 burials of men, women, and children in the graveyard at Chapel-le-Dale dating from the time of its construction. The church has a memorial to the railway workers. The line over the bridge was opened to goods traffic on 3 August 1875, but passenger trains did not commence running until 1 May 1876, following approval of the works by Colonel F. H. Rich, an Inspecting Officer of the Board of Trade.

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