Oil on canvas by Brian Palmer in gilt frame, showing a WW1 British Royal Flying Corps Sopwith 'Pup' (Scout) biplane fighter in flight

- Image ID: HYHJ4E
Oil on canvas by Brian Palmer in gilt frame, showing a WW1 British Royal Flying Corps Sopwith 'Pup' (Scout) biplane fighter in flight
Marc Tielemans / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: HYHJ4E
The Sopwith Pup was a British single-seater biplane fighter aircraft built by the Sopwith Aviation Company. It entered service with the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service in the autumn of 1916. With pleasant flying characteristics and good manoeuvrability, the aircraft proved very successful. The Pup was eventually outclassed by newer German fighters, but it was not completely replaced on the Western Front until the end of 1917. The Pup was officially named the Sopwith Scout. The "Pup" nickname arose because pilots considered it to be the "pup" of the larger two-seat Sopwith 1½ Strutter. The name never had official status as it was felt to be "undignified,"[6] but a precedent was set, and all later Sopwith types apart from the Triplane acquired animal names (Camel, Dolphin, Snipe etc.), which ended up with the Sopwith firm being said to have created a "flying zoo" during the First World War.