Martef Basement Theater young actors perform "The Strength to Tell" to honor Holocaust survivors. Jerusalem, Israel. 07/09/2011.

- Image ID: C717TY
Martef Basement Theater young actors perform "The Strength to Tell" to honor Holocaust survivors. Jerusalem, Israel. 07/09/2011.
Nir Alon / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: C717TY
Martef (Basement) Theatre actors wear a yellow Star of David performing “The Strength to Tell” honoring holocaust survivors. Jerusalem, Israel. 07/09/2011. “On this spot, where I stand before you, the judges of Israel, to prosecute Adolph Eichmann – I am not alone. Standing at my side are six million prosecutors. But they cannot rise to their feet; they cannot point an accusing finger at the glass booth nor shout at the accused sitting inside. I am the accuser. Because their ashes are piled up among the hills of Auschwitz and the fields of Treblinka, washed away in the rivers of Poland and their graves are dispersed throughout the length and width of the land of Europe. Their blood screams out but their voices are unheard. I will therefore be their mouth and read the horrific charges on their behalf.” The trial of SS-Obersturmbannfuhrer, Adolph Otto Eichmann opened with this statement by the prosecutor, Attorney General, Gideon Hausner, before the Jerusalem District Court, on April 11th, 1961, convened in the Bet Haam auditorium to allow enough seating arrangements for the crowds that gathered to watch, listen, learn and to cry in horror and disbelief. Eichmann’s prosecution was made possible by his capture in a daring undercover operation carried out by Mossad in which he was found in Argentina under a fraudulent ID, identified, captured and secretly transported to Israel to face justice. Eichmann was responsible for the facilitating and managing the logistics of mass deportation of Jews to ghettos and extermination camps in German-occupied Eastern Europe. Michael A. Musmanno, a U.S. naval officer in 1945, who had questioned the Nuremberg defendants and would later go on to become a Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, testified that the late Hermann Goring "made it very clear that Eichmann was the man to determine, in what order, in what countries, the Jews were to die." Eichmann was convicted on fifteen charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes,
Location: Gerard Bachar Center, Jerusalem, Israel

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