Maratea, on western coast southern Italy, overlooking Policastro Gulf in Tyrrhenian Sea, founded 8th-C BC by the Greeks: Marina beach south of town.

- Image ID: B7JXJ0
Maratea, on western coast southern Italy, overlooking Policastro Gulf in Tyrrhenian Sea, founded 8th-C BC by the Greeks: Marina beach south of town.
Robin Chapman / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B7JXJ0
Maratea, on the western coast of southern Italy, overlooking the Policastro Gulf in the Tyrrhenian Sea, was founded around the 8th-C. BC by the Greeks. During the 9th-C. AD, belonging to the Longobard principality of Salerno, it took in refugees fleeing from the Saracens. It was invaded by the Normans, belonged to the Aragonese, was attacked many times by the Turks and had its fortress destroyed by Napoleon’s troops. Known, for obvious reasons, as the “city of 44 churches”, it is now a tourist town which, during the summer, puts on classical and folk music concerts, ballet and theatre performances, art exhibitions and gastronomy courses. On the 600-metre/2,000-foot crag of Monte San Biaggio above the relatively more-recently built Maratea Inferiore, near the ruins of Maratea Superiore and the 6th-C. Basilica San Biaggio, stands a 22-metre/72-foot high, 19-metre/62-foot wide statue of Christ the Redeemer – Il Redentore – which, designed by Florentine artist Bruno Innocenti and made from marble from Carrara, was erected in 1965. It is the highest such statue in Europe and second-only to the Corcovado statue in Rio de Janeiro, which it imitates. On the water`s-edge below the crag is the small, attractive Porto di Maratea.
Location: Maratea, Potenza, Basilicata, southern Italy