Map of The Turkish Empire by Petrus Kaerius 1646 from John Speed Prospect of the most Famous Parts of the World 1675 JMH6026

- Image ID: CT1N2K
Map of The Turkish Empire by Petrus Kaerius 1646 from John Speed Prospect of the most Famous Parts of the World Stock Photo
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Map of The Turkish Empire by Petrus Kaerius 1646 from John Speed Prospect of the most Famous Parts of the World 1675 JMH6026
John Henshall / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: CT1N2K
Normal contrast version. (See CT1N9B for high contrast version). The Turkish Empire Seventeenth century antique map of the world by Petrus Kaerius (Pieter van den Keere) 1646 from John Speed's 'Prospect of the most Famous Parts of the World' published by George and Ric(hard) Chiswell London 1675. This was known as the 'miniature Speed' atlas. The original is 12.2 x 8.5 cm 4.8 x 3.4 inches approximately printed area. This photograph is four times actual size at 300 pixels per inch. Wikipedia says: The Ottoman Empire was one of the lasting empires in history; such that the Ottoman State, its politics, conflicts, and cultural heritage in a vast geography provide one of the longest continuous narratives. During the 16th and 17th centuries, in particular at the height of its power under the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent, the empire was one of the most powerful states in the world – a multinational, multilingual empire that stretched from the southern borders of the Holy Roman Empire to the outskirts of Vienna, Royal Hungary (modern Slovakia) and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in the north to Yemen and Eritrea in the south; from Algeria in the west to Azerbaijan in the east; controlling much of southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa. At the beginning of the 17th century the empire contained 32 provinces and numerous vassal states, some of which were later absorbed into the empire, while others were granted various types of autonomy during the course of centuries. With Constantinople as its capital and vast control of lands around the Mediterranean basin, the empire was at the centre or center of interactions between the Eastern and Western worlds for over six centuries.