Vice Admiral Ludwig von Reuter
RMC45KPWVice Admiral Ludwig von Reuter
Reuter, Ludwig von, 9.2.1869 - 18.12.1943, German admiral, portrait, circa 1918,
RMCP1PEEReuter, Ludwig von, 9.2.1869 - 18.12.1943, German admiral, portrait, circa 1918,
1872 WP Ludwig von Reuter
RMPBJR5F1872 WP Ludwig von Reuter
The scuttling of the German fleet carried out on 21 June 1919 took place at the Royal Navy's base at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, after the First World War. The High Seas Fleet was interned there under the terms of the Armistice whilst negotiations took place over the fate of the ships, but Admiral Ludwig von Reuter decided to scuttle the fleet, however British guard ships beached 22 of the 74 interned vessels. The photograph illustrates one of the many wrecks were salvaged over the next two decades and were towed away for scrapping.
RMR8J1M4The scuttling of the German fleet carried out on 21 June 1919 took place at the Royal Navy's base at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, after the First World War. The High Seas Fleet was interned there under the terms of the Armistice whilst negotiations took place over the fate of the ships, but Admiral Ludwig von Reuter decided to scuttle the fleet, however British guard ships beached 22 of the 74 interned vessels. The photograph illustrates one of the many wrecks were salvaged over the next two decades and were towed away for scrapping.
Scapa Flow, scuttling of High Seas fleet
RMJK2E6HScapa Flow, scuttling of High Seas fleet
WP Ludwig von Reuter
RMKEPWX4WP Ludwig von Reuter
Following the German defeat in WWI, 74 ships of the Kaiserliche Marine's High Seas Fleet were interned in Gutter Sound at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles. On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed with no word of a settlement 1919
RMP66W0FFollowing the German defeat in WWI, 74 ships of the Kaiserliche Marine's High Seas Fleet were interned in Gutter Sound at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles. On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed with no word of a settlement 1919
'Unknown; English: Command flag, Rear Admiral, Imperial Germany (1869-1918) Command flag, Rear Admiral, Imperial Germany, 1869-1918 pattern. It was reputedly removed from the battlecruiser 'Hindenburg' 1915 after her scuttling at Scapa Flow, 21 June 1919. The 'Hindenburg' sank slowly on an even keel, and her upperworks remained above the water. In 1930 she was re-floated and towed away for scrap. The flag is likely to be that of the German Commander of the interned fleet, Rear-Admiral Ludwig von Reuter (1869-1943). It was he who ordered that its ships should be sunk rather than be handed over
RM2BA194C'Unknown; English: Command flag, Rear Admiral, Imperial Germany (1869-1918) Command flag, Rear Admiral, Imperial Germany, 1869-1918 pattern. It was reputedly removed from the battlecruiser 'Hindenburg' 1915 after her scuttling at Scapa Flow, 21 June 1919. The 'Hindenburg' sank slowly on an even keel, and her upperworks remained above the water. In 1930 she was re-floated and towed away for scrap. The flag is likely to be that of the German Commander of the interned fleet, Rear-Admiral Ludwig von Reuter (1869-1943). It was he who ordered that its ships should be sunk rather than be handed over
The main portion of the German Naval fleet surrendered and were taken to SCapa Flow in the Scottish Orkneys.  The High Seas Fleet was interned there under the terms of the Armistice whilst negotiations took place over the fate of the ships. Fearing that all of the ships would be seized and divided amongst the allied powers, the German commander, Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, decided to scuttle the fleet on 21 June 1919. Intervening British guard ships were able to beach a number of the ships, but 52 of the 74 interned vessels sank.
RMP81FRHThe main portion of the German Naval fleet surrendered and were taken to SCapa Flow in the Scottish Orkneys. The High Seas Fleet was interned there under the terms of the Armistice whilst negotiations took place over the fate of the ships. Fearing that all of the ships would be seized and divided amongst the allied powers, the German commander, Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, decided to scuttle the fleet on 21 June 1919. Intervening British guard ships were able to beach a number of the ships, but 52 of the 74 interned vessels sank.
An aerial view of the Orkney Islands, Scotland May 3, 2014. During both World Wars, Scapa Flow was an important British naval base, and the site of significant loss of life. Following the end of World War One, 74 German warships were interned there, and on June 21, 1919 most were deliberately sunk, or scuttled, at the orders of German Rear Admiral Ludwig Von Reuter, who mistakenly thought that the Armistice had broken down and wanted to prevent the British from using the ships. Now Scapa Flow is a popular site for divers, who explore the few wrecks that still remain at the bottom. The year 201
RM2CP62BEAn aerial view of the Orkney Islands, Scotland May 3, 2014. During both World Wars, Scapa Flow was an important British naval base, and the site of significant loss of life. Following the end of World War One, 74 German warships were interned there, and on June 21, 1919 most were deliberately sunk, or scuttled, at the orders of German Rear Admiral Ludwig Von Reuter, who mistakenly thought that the Armistice had broken down and wanted to prevent the British from using the ships. Now Scapa Flow is a popular site for divers, who explore the few wrecks that still remain at the bottom. The year 201
742 Hans Hermann Ludwig von Reuter
RMPBKD95742 Hans Hermann Ludwig von Reuter
Following the German defeat in WWI, 74 ships of the Kaiserliche Marine's High Seas Fleet were interned in Gutter Sound at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles. On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed with no word of a settlement 1919
RMP66W0XFollowing the German defeat in WWI, 74 ships of the Kaiserliche Marine's High Seas Fleet were interned in Gutter Sound at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles. On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed with no word of a settlement 1919