Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30 1865 - January 18, 1936) was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British

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Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30 1865 - January 18, 1936) was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old. Kipling is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story; his children's books are classics of children's literature. He was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date. He kept writing until the early 1930s, but at a slower pace and with much less success than before. Less than one year before his death Kipling gave a speech (titled "An Undefended Island") to The Royal Society of St George on May 6, 1935 warning of the danger which Nazi Germany posed to Britain. On the night of January 12,1936, Kipling suffered a hemorrhage in his small intestine. He underwent surgery, but died less than a week later at the age of 70 of a perforated duodenal ulcer. Kipling is best remembered for his works of fiction: The Jungle Book, Just So Stories and Kim and his short story "The Man Who Would Be King".