Illustration of European perch Perca fluviatilis, European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax, Zander Sander lucioperca

- Image ID: B91PE8
Illustration of European perch Perca fluviatilis, European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax, Zander Sander lucioperca Stock Photo
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Illustration of European perch Perca fluviatilis, European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax, Zander Sander lucioperca
markku murto/art / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B91PE8
The European perch (Perca fluviatilis) is a highly predatory species of perch found in Europe and Asia. In some areas it is known as the redfin perch or English perch, and it is often referred to by the shortform perch. The species is very popular and has been widely introduced beyond its native area, into Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. They have caused substantial damage to native fish populations in Australia. The European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, also known as Morone labrax, is a primarily ocean-going fish that sometimes enters brackish and fresh water. It is also known as the sea dace. As a food fish, it is often marketed as mediterranean seabass, bronzini or branzini ("branzino" is the name of the fish in Northern Italy; in other parts of the country it is called "spigola" or "ragno"). Zander scientific name is Sander lucioperca (or Stizostedion lucioperca), and it is closely allied to perch. Zander are often called pike-perch as they resemble the pike with their elongated body and head, and the perch with their spiny dorsal fin. Zander are not, as is commonly believed, a pike and perch hybrid. In Europe, a second species (Lucioperca wolgensis) is limited to rivers in southern Russia and the basin of the Danube. The zander is a common and popular game fish in Europe. It is often eaten, and it may reach 15 kilograms in size, although typical catches are considerably smaller. Zander are not indigenous to the UK, but was introduced into the East Anglian broads (large, partly artificial waterways) in the 20th century, and spread rapidly at the expense of native fishes.