hunting with cheetah in india The Asiatic Cheetah, derived from Sanskrit word chitraka meaning "speckled") (Acinonyx jubatus ven

- Image ID: B7PW4K
hunting with cheetah in india The Asiatic Cheetah, derived from Sanskrit word chitraka meaning "speckled") (Acinonyx jubatus ven
19th era / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B7PW4K
The Asiatic Cheetah, derived from Sanskrit word chitraka meaning "speckled") (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) is now also known as the Iranian Cheetah and although recently extinct in India it is also known as the Indian Cheetah. Asiatic Cheetah is a rare critically endangered subspecies of the Cheetah found today only in Iran, with some rare chances and very occasional sightings in south western Pakistan. It lives in its vast central desert in fragmented pieces of remaining suitable habitat. In recent times in the last century this once numerous and common animal was driven to extinction elsewhere in its entire former range in Southwest Asia from Arabia to India including Afghanistan; latest research shows that only 70 to 100 Asiatic Cheetahs are estimated to remain, most of them in Iran with some sightings in Pakistan. This is the result of continuous field surveys, all of which have been verified by the results of more than 12,000 nights of camera trapping inside its fragmented Iranian desert habitats during the past 10 years. The Asiatic Cheetah and the Persian Leopard are the only remaining species of large cats in Iran today with the once common Caspian Tiger and Asiatic Lion having already been driven to extinction in the last century; however in the case of Asiatic lions the world's last few continue to exist in India. The Asiatic Cheetah once ranged from Arabia to India, through Iran, central Asia, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. In Iran and the Indian subcontinent, it was particularly numerous. Cheetahs are the only big cat that can be tamed and trained to hunt gazelle. The Mughal Emperor of India, Akbar, was said to have had 1,000 cheetahs at one time, something depicted in many Persian and Indian miniature paintings. The numerous constraints regarding the Cheetah’s conservation contribute to its general susceptibility and its very complex conservation: e.g., its low fertility rate, the high mortality rate of the cubs due to genetic factors,