Hot Mulled Buckfast Tonic Wine Glasgow German Market, Scotland, UK

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Image ID: HE7MF1
Buckfast Tonic Wine, commonly known as Buckfast or Buckie, is a fortified wine with caffeine, licensed from Buckfast Abbey in Devon and distributed by J. Chandler & Company in the United Kingdom and Grants of Ireland in Ireland. The drink has become a subject of controversy in Scotland due to its links with ned culture; a senior politician labelled it as "a badge of pride amongst those who are involved in antisocial behaviour". Buckfast is very popular in Scotland, the sales of the product were monitored in 2014 by the Scottish government to see if the "Buckfast Triangle" still stood. The test showed that the towns and cities where Buckfast was sold highest per capita were, in order, Glasgow and the surrounding areas, East Kilbride, Hamilton, Cambuslang, and Coatbridge, all of which are in the northern areas of Lanarkshire, excepting Glasgow. Several Scottish politicians and social activists have singled out Buckfast Tonic Wine as being particularly responsible for crime, disorder, and general social deprivation in these communities. Although Buckfast accounts for only 0.5% of alcohol sales in Scotland, the figure is markedly higher in Lanarkshire. Helen Liddell, former Secretary of State for Scotland, called for the wine to be banned. In 2005, Scottish Justice Minister Cathy Jamieson suggested that retailers should stop selling the wine. On a subsequent visit to Auchinleck within her constituency, she was greeted by teenagers chanting, "Don't ban Buckie". Jamieson then received correspondence from lawyers acting for Buckfast distributors, J. Chandler & Company, in Andover. A further consequence was that Buckfast sales increased substantially in the months following Jamieson's comments
Location: George Square,Glasgow,Scotland,UK