En echelon fractures in a rock, County Kerry, Ireland.

En echelon fractures in a rock, County Kerry, Ireland. Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Vincent Lowe / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

BMFEPY

File size:

49.8 MB (3.5 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

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Dimensions:

5120 x 3403 px | 43.3 x 28.8 cm | 17.1 x 11.3 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

16 May 2005

Location:

Near Lough Caragh, County Kerry, Ireland.

More information:

En echelon fractures are formed by lateral movement under shear stress. The veins are filled by later stage hydrothermal minerals, either quartz or calcite. I am not a geologist and I am not sure what type of rock the host was but it was probably sandstone (it was at the foot of Macgillycuddy's Reeks in Ireland). Although I have included 'intrusion' in the keywords I'm told these are not actually intrusions but are sometimes mistakenly called that.