Elephant Shower That's a heffalump of a shower trunk! Two ladies enjoy the tusk of taking a pachyderm power shower at Chitawan National Jungle Park, Sauraha, Nepal. An elephant's trunk is a versatile appendage. Often over 5 feet long It contains up to 150,000 separate muscles, with no bone and only a tiny amount of fat. As well as being atuneful trunk-eter, it is also adept at lifting up to 350 kg (770 lb), reaching at a height of up to 7 m (23 ft), digging under mud or sand and sucking up water both to drink and to spray on their bodies. It is this latter skill that attracts visitors to the

- Image ID: E41HRP
WENN Rights Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: E41HRP
Elephant Shower That's a heffalump of a shower trunk! Two ladies enjoy the tusk of taking a pachyderm power shower at Chitawan National Jungle Park, Sauraha, Nepal. An elephant's trunk is a versatile appendage. Often over 5 feet long It contains up to 150,000 separate muscles, with no bone and only a tiny amount of fat. As well as being atuneful trunk-eter, it is also adept at lifting up to 350 kg (770 lb), reaching at a height of up to 7 m (23 ft), digging under mud or sand and sucking up water both to drink and to spray on their bodies. It is this latter skill that attracts visitors to the Elephant Breeding Center - one of two in the world - located on the floodplains of the rivers Reu, Rapti and Narayani, a flat region of grassland, swamps and lakes 150 m (500 ft) above sea level The name 'Chitwan' translates as 'the heart of the jungle'. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, cultivation in the valley where the national park is located was deliberately prohibited by the government of Nepal in order to maintain a barrier of disease-ridden forests as a defence against the invasion of diseases from the south. Then, for the century between 1846 and 1950, Chitwan was declared a private hunting reserve by the Rana de facto rulers of Nepal, maintained exclusively for the privileged classes. The Ranas invited royalty and dignitaries from Europe and the Princely States of India, during the cool, mosquito-free winter months from December to February - often with several hundred leopards. Penalties for poaching were severe - capital punishment for killing rhino - and the wildlife in the area thus received a measure of protection. At the time of its establishment In 1973, Chitwan National Park covered 210 square miles. After an extension in 1980, it now covers 620 square miles. Another enlargement, now proposed, containing a wide variety of habitats, from the grassland and riverine forests of the valleys to the sal forest on the hills and the chir pine that grows a

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