bows and rigging of HMS Victory, in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The only surviving naval warship that represents the skill of naval dockyard shipwrights, ship designers and the industrial ability of Britain during the mid 18th century. She was Admiral Lord Nelson's flagship at the battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, the most decisive British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815). Twenty-seven British ships defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships under French Admiral Pierre Villeneuve. The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had establi

bows and rigging of HMS Victory, in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The only surviving naval warship that represents the skill of naval dockyard shipwrights, ship designers and the industrial ability of Britain during the mid 18th century. She was Admiral Lord Nelson's flagship at the battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, the most decisive British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815). Twenty-seven British ships defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships under French Admiral Pierre Villeneuve. The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had establi Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Lebrecht Music & Arts / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

FW5M9E

File size:

34.5 MB (2.3 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2832 x 4256 px | 24 x 36 cm | 9.4 x 14.2 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

11 October 2010

Photographer:

Lebrecht

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

bows and rigging of HMS Victory, in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The only surviving naval warship that represents the skill of naval dockyard shipwrights, ship designers and the industrial ability of Britain during the mid 18th century. She was Admiral Lord Nelson's flagship at the battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, the most decisive British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815). Twenty-seven British ships defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships under French Admiral Pierre Villeneuve. The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the past century. John Dickens worked in Portsmouth at the Naval Pay Office in 1812, at the time of the birth of his son, novelist Charles Dickens.

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