Ancient greek relief detail incised on marble plaque

- Image ID: D14A1E
Ancient greek relief detail incised on marble plaque
PANAGIOTIS KARAPANAGIOTIS / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: D14A1E
Greek temples (Ancient Greek: ὁ ναός, ho naós "dwelling", semantically distinct from Latin templum "temple") were structures built to house deity statues within Greek sanctuaries in Greek paganism. The temples themselves did usually not directly serve a cult purpose, since the sacrifices and rituals dedicated to the respective deity took place outside them. Temples were frequently used to store votive offerings. They are the most important and most widespread building type in Greek architecture. In the Hellenistic kingdoms of Southwest Asia and of North Africa, buildings erected to fulfill the functions of a temple often continued to follow the local traditions. Even where a Greek influence is visible, such structures are not normally considered as Greek temples. This applies, for example, to the Graeco-Parthian and Bactrian temples, or to the Ptolemaic examples, which follow Egyptian tradition. Most Greek temples were oriented astronomically.
Location: Corfu, Greece