acre 14th C map cartography Byzantine army Heraclius Muslim army Khalid ibn al-Walid Battle of Yarmouk, Christian city

- Image ID: BT64WW
acre 14th C map cartography Byzantine army Heraclius Muslim army Khalid ibn al-Walid Battle of Yarmouk, Christian city
2d Alan King / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: BT64WW
acre 14th C map cartography Byzantine army Heraclius Muslim army Khalid ibn al-Walid Battle of Yarmouk, Christian city Jerusalem Caliph Umar, Arab caliphate Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates that followed, and through Crusader rule into the 13th century. It was captured by King Baldwin I of Jerusalem in 1104 in the First Crusade and the Crusaders also made the town their chief port in Palestine. Around 1170 it became the main port of the eastern Mediterranean, and the kingdom of Jerusalem was regarded in the west as enormously wealthy above all because of Acre. According to an English contemporary, it provided more for the Crusader crown than the total revenues of the king of England. It was re-taken by Saladin in 1187, and unexpectedly besieged by Guy of Lusignan reinforced by Pisan naval and ground forces at first, in August 1189. But it was not captured until July 1191 by Richard I of England, Philip of France, Leopold of Austria with what was left of the German army and the rest of the crusader's army. It then became the capital of the remnant of the Kingdom of Jerusalem in 1192. In 1229 it was placed under the control of the Knights Hospitaller. The Crusaders called the city "Acre" or "Saint-Jean d'Acre" since they mistakenly identified it with the Philistine city of Ekron[citation needed], in northern Philistia, now southern Israel. It was the final stronghold of the Crusader state, and fell to the Mameluks of the Ayyubid Sultanate in a bloody siege in 1291.