A black & white Merle lurcher, which is the offspring of a sighthound mated with another breed, Rescue Dog wearing red scarf.

- Image ID: B1DJMH
A black & white Merle lurcher, which is the offspring of a sighthound mated with another breed, Rescue Dog wearing red scarf.
MediaWorldImages / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B1DJMH
The Lurcher is not a dog breed, but rather a type of dog. It is a hardy crossbred sighthound that is generally a cross between a sighthound and a working breed, usually a pastoral dog or Terrier. Collie crosses have always been very popular. Lurchers can be crossed several times. There is no set type, so they can be as small as a Whippet or as large as a Deerhound; but most are chosen for a size similar to that of a Greyhound, and a distinct sighthound form is preferred. The Lurcher was bred in Ireland and Great Britain by the Irish Gypsies and travellers in the 17th century. They were used for poaching rabbits, hares and other small creatures. The name Lurcher is a derived name from the Romani language word lur, which means thief. The travellers considered the short-haired Lurcher the most prized. The Lurcher is rarely seen outside of Ireland or Great Britain, and is still common in its native land. The Collie crosses were often not large enough to do the work the Lurcher was intended for. Irish Romany or Roma people were instrumental in developing the breed, and traditionally sneered at any Lurcher that was not predominantly genetically Greyhound, since these "lesser" Lurchers were not as good at hunting and could not stand a full day's work of the hunt. The stringent training methods of the Gypsies are looked down upon in some Lurcher circles, since the pups began working at six months old. Only the top-producing pups were kept; the rest were sold at traditional bargain rates. Today some breeding is carried out in a more systematic manner, with Lurchers bred to Lurchers to perpetuate the "breed's" prowess at rabbit and hare coursing
Location: Banchory Scotland uk