16th century Town Hall w bell tower of Dekansky kostel rising over Zizkovo Namest Central Square Tabor Czech Republic

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16th century Town Hall w bell tower of Dekansky kostel rising over Zizkovo Namest Central Square Tabor Czech Republic Stock Photo
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16th century Town Hall w bell tower of Dekansky kostel rising over Zizkovo Namest Central Square Tabor Czech Republic
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Image ID: A3GF4T
16th century Town Hall w bell tower of Dekansky kostel rising over Zizkovo Namest Central Square Tabor Czech Republic. Tábor (IPA: [ˈtaːbor]) is a city of the Czech Republic, in the South Bohemian Region. It is named after Mount Tabor, which is believed by many to be the place of the Transfiguration of Christ; however, the name became popular and nowadays translates to "camp" or "encampment" in the Czech language. The town was founded in the spring of 1420 by Petr Hromádka of Jistebnice and Jan Bydlínský of Bydlín from the most radical wing of the Hussites, who soon became known as the Taborites. The town is iconic for the years in which it flourished as an egalitarian peasant commune. This spirit is celebrated in Smetana's "Song of Freedom", made famous in the English-speaking world by Paul Robeson's recording in Czech and English. The historical part of the town is situated on the summit of an isolated hill separated from the surrounding country by the Lužnice river and by an extensive lake, to which the Hussites gave the biblical name of Jordan. This lake, founded 1492, is the oldest reservoir of its kind in Central Europe. The historical importance of the city of Tábor only ceased when it was captured by King George of Poděbrady in 1452. The Jordan is 53 hectares in size and is used for swimming in the summer. Though a large part of the ancient fortifications has been demolished, Tábor (or Hradiště Hory Tábor, the castle of the Tábor Hill, as it was called in the Hussite period) still preserves many memorials of its past fame. In the centre of the city is Žižka Square. Only very narrow streets lead to it, to render the approach to it more difficult in time of war. First-time visitors may not even suspect that there is an ingenious labyrinth of tunnels under the houses and streets here. The townspeople dug cellars under their houses and these were subsequently interconnected; an approximately 1 km-long section of the tunnel system is open to the pub
Location: Central Square, Tabor, Czech Republic, Europe