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William Penn, founder of the State of Pennsylvania

William Penn, founder of the State of Pennsylvania Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Historical Images Archive / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

KKE5F8

File size:

39.3 MB (1.9 MB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

4129 x 3323 px | 35 x 28.1 cm | 13.8 x 11.1 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

November 30, 2017

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This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Illustration from a special edition history of England published in 1903. Info from wiki: William Penn (14 October 1644 – 30 July 1718) was the son of Sir William Penn, and was an English real estate entrepreneur, philosopher, early Quaker, and founder of the State of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and the future Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He was an early advocate of democracy and religious freedom, notable for his good relations and successful treaties with the Lenape Native Americans. Under his direction, the city of Philadelphia was planned and developed. As one of the earlier supporters of colonial unification, Penn wrote and urged for a union of all the English colonies in what was to become the United States of America. The democratic principles that he set forth in the Pennsylvania Frame of Government served as an inspiration for the United States Constitution. As a pacifist Quaker, Penn considered the problems of war and peace deeply. He developed a forward-looking project for a United States of Europe through the creation of a European Assembly made of deputies that could discuss and adjudicate controversies peacefully. He is therefore considered the very first thinker to suggest the creation of a European Parliament.[2] A man of extreme religious convictions, Penn wrote numerous works in which he exhorted believers to adhere to the spirit of Primitive Christianity.[3] He was imprisoned several times in the Tower of London due to his faith, and his book No Cross, No Crown (1669), which he wrote while in prison, has become a Christian classic.[4]