Side view of the 1980 F1 World Championship Winning, Williams FW07 Formula One Car, driven by Alan Jones, on display at the 2017 Silverstone Classic

Side view of the 1980 F1 World Championship Winning, Williams FW07 Formula One Car, driven by Alan Jones, on display at the 2017 Silverstone Classic Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

John Gaffen / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

KMPXDN

File size:

51.2 MB (2.1 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

5381 x 3326 px | 45.6 x 28.2 cm | 17.9 x 11.1 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

28 July 2017

Location:

Silverstone Circuit, Towcester, United Kingdom

More information:

The Williams FW07 was a ground effect Formula One racing car designed by Patrick Head, Frank Dernie, and Neil Oatley for the 1979 F1 season. It was closely based on the Lotus 79, even being developed in the same wind tunnel at Imperial College London. Some observers, among them Lotus aerodynamicist Peter Wright felt the FW07 was little more than a re-engineered Lotus 79. The car was small and simple and extremely light, powered by the ubiquitous Ford Cosworth DFV. It had very clean lines and seemed to be a strong challenger for the new season, but early reliability problems halted any serious threat for the title. While not the first to use ground effects in Formula One, an honour belonging to Colin Chapman and the Lotus 78 (the Lotus 79's predecessor), Head may have had a better grasp of the principles than even Chapman The FW07 became FW07B in 1980, and Regazzoni was replaced by Carlos Reutemann. While the latter and Williams's other driver, Alan Jones, formed a successful partnership, they were not comfortable with each other. Both drivers developed the FW07 further, working especially on setup and suspension strengthening. The car was now so efficient in creating downforce from its ground effect design that the front wings were unnecessary. Jones won five races in Argentina, France, Britain, Canada and Watkins Glen in the USA to win his only world championship, while Reutemann won at a wet race in Monaco. Williams won also their first Constructors' Championship. The main challenge to the FW07 came from Nelson Piquet in Brabham's neat BT49 The DFV is an internal combustion engine that was originally produced by Cosworth for Formula One motor racing. The name was an abbreviation of Double Four Valve, the engine being a V8 development of the earlier four-cylinder FVA, which had four valves per cylinder. Its development in 1967 for Colin Chapman's Team Lotus was sponsored by Ford. For many years it was the dominant engine in Formula One,

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