Common Coot or Eurasian Coot,(Fulica atra), with partial leucism (leukism) in feathers, Regents park, London, United Kingdom

- Image ID: KRPCE5
Dominic Robinson / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: KRPCE5
Leucism (occasionally spelled leukism) is a general term for the phenotype resulting from defects in pigment cell differentiation and/or migration from the neural crest to skin, hair, or feathers during development. This results in either the entire surface (if all pigment cells fail to develop) or patches of body surface (if only a subset are defective) having a lack of cells capable of making pigment. More common than a complete absence of pigment cells is localized or incomplete hypopigmentation, resulting in irregular patches of white on an animal that otherwise has normal colouring and patterning. This partial leucism is known as a "pied" or "piebald" effect; and the ratio of white to normal-coloured skin can vary considerably not only between generations, but between different offspring from the same parents, and even between members of the same litter. This is notable in horses, cows, cats, dogs, and the carrion crow.
Location: Regents Park, London, United Kingdom