St Nicholas [serial] . COTTON GROWN IN CHICAGO. heretofore always killed the plant before it could fullydevelop. — R. Phillips, Pullman, 111. I suggest that our Northern readers try plant-ing cotton-seed in earth in a box or a flower-potin the house early in April, and then transplant-ing to the garden about the middle of May. Letus see how far north cotton may be grown. There were not a fewsurprises among the con-tributions this month.In the first place therewas considerable inge-nuity displayed by manycontributors in adapt-ing their drawings tothe subject SomethingRound, as is shown ata glan

St Nicholas [serial] . COTTON GROWN IN CHICAGO. heretofore always killed the plant before it could fullydevelop. — R. Phillips, Pullman, 111. I suggest that our Northern readers try plant-ing cotton-seed in earth in a box or a flower-potin the house early in April, and then transplant-ing to the garden about the middle of May. Letus see how far north cotton may be grown. There were not a fewsurprises among the con-tributions this month.In the first place therewas considerable inge-nuity displayed by manycontributors in adapt-ing their drawings tothe subject SomethingRound, as is shown ata glan Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJ8FCK

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1577 x 1584 px | 26.7 x 26.8 cm | 10.5 x 10.6 inches | 150dpi

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St Nicholas [serial] . COTTON GROWN IN CHICAGO. heretofore always killed the plant before it could fullydevelop. — R. Phillips, Pullman, 111. I suggest that our Northern readers try plant-ing cotton-seed in earth in a box or a flower-potin the house early in April, and then transplant-ing to the garden about the middle of May. Letus see how far north cotton may be grown. There were not a fewsurprises among the con-tributions this month.In the first place therewas considerable inge-nuity displayed by manycontributors in adapt-ing their drawings tothe subject SomethingRound, as is shown ata glance by the threeclever designs upon thispage. The entire rowof little pictures at thetop of page 570 exhibitsthe many different viewsof Something Round that can be taken in verysimple drawings. Therewas not a little humor, too, in the selection ofa simple circle amongthese! It suggests the. HEADING. BY HUGO GRFENBAUM, AGE 17. (HONOR MEMBER ) prank of the mischiev-ous scholars Agnes Mialltells of in her School-room Incident, on page569, where a blank sheetof paper was made toserve as a compositionon the subject The Re-sult of Laziness. Theprose contributions, bythe way, were unusuallyinteresting this month —good-natured tales outof school that tell ofodd or amusing happen-ings in school. Winter Scenes wasa popular subject for theyoung camera - lovers, and their success speaksfor itself in the manyexcellent photographsprinted this month. PRIZE-WINNERS, COMPETITION No. 122 In making the awards, contributors ages are considered.PROSE. Silver badges, Helen Dirks (age 16), Dresden, Germany; Dorothy H. Hoskins (age n), Toronto, Can.VERSE. Gold badge, Katharine Norton (age 17), Newton Center, Mass. Silver badges, Catharine H. Straker (age 17), Shorncliffe, England; Lois E. Sandison (age 14), Terre Haute, IndDRAWING. Silver badges, L. William Quanchi (age 17), New York City; Mar

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