Side chair (one of a pair). Culture: Austrian, Vienna. Dimensions: 37 1/8 x 22 1/8 x 19 in. (94.3 x 56.2 x 48.3 cm). Maker: Circle of Josef Danhauser 's K.K. Priv. Möbel-Fabrik, Vienna. Date: ca. 1815-20. The years between 1815 and 1848 in Germany and Austria were characterized by a conservative political and cultural climate. The period and its style of interior decoration are both called Biedermeier, after a fictional character invented by the poet Ludwig Eichrodt (1827-1892) in the 1850s. Although the term invokes qualities typical of the German bourgeoisie (unpretentiousness, thrift, dom

- Image ID: PA9818
Side chair (one of a pair). Culture: Austrian, Vienna. Dimensions: 37 1/8 x 22 1/8 x 19 in. (94.3 x 56.2 x 48.3 cm). Maker: Circle of Josef Danhauser 's K.K. Priv. Möbel-Fabrik, Vienna. Date: ca. 1815-20. The years between 1815 and 1848 in Germany and Austria were characterized by a conservative political and cultural climate. The period and its style of interior decoration are both called Biedermeier, after a fictional character invented by the poet Ludwig Eichrodt (1827-1892) in the 1850s. Although the term invokes qualities typical of the German bourgeoisie (unpretentiousness, thrift, dom
Album / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PA9818
Side chair (one of a pair). Culture: Austrian, Vienna. Dimensions: 37 1/8 x 22 1/8 x 19 in. (94.3 x 56.2 x 48.3 cm). Maker: Circle of Josef Danhauser 's K.K. Priv. Möbel-Fabrik, Vienna. Date: ca. 1815-20. The years between 1815 and 1848 in Germany and Austria were characterized by a conservative political and cultural climate. The period and its style of interior decoration are both called Biedermeier, after a fictional character invented by the poet Ludwig Eichrodt (1827-1892) in the 1850s. Although the term invokes qualities typical of the German bourgeoisie (unpretentiousness, thrift, domesticity), the origin of the Biedermeier furniture style was totally aristocratic. The simple, elegant forms with their clean lines and light-colored wood veneer derived from the ornamentally restrained furniture that had been made for the royal and princely households of Germany, Austria, and France beginning in the late eighteenth century.[1] For this market, even Parisian ébénistes, such as Canabas, Saunier, Jacob, and Molitor,[2] produced simple mahogany pieces that were set apart only by their excellent materials and outstanding craftsmanship.[3] Berlin, Munich, and Viennese cabinetmakers followed suit, creating similar, refined furniture.[4] Contemporary watercolors document that Biedermeier interiors were characterized by the use of strong colors for paint, wallpaper, and fabrics.[5] Consequently, the upholstery specialist of the Metropolitan Museum's Objects Conservation Department was delighted but not surprised to discover some silk threads of a strong aquamarine color beneath the former show covers on the present chair and its pair, which is also in the Museum's collection.[6] An appropriate fabric was acquired and dyed to match these remnants of the earliest upholstery. Seldom are curators and conservators given such a splendid opportunity to recreate the original appearance of a piece of furniture and to do it with the correct material, in this case, precious silk

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