Shakespeare as a physicianComprising every word which in any way relates to medicine, surgery or obstetrics, found in the complete works of that writer, with criticisms and comparison of the same with the medical thoughts of to-day . , as the following will show: (Enter an attendant.) Lady M. What is your tidings ? Attendant. The king comes here to-night. Lady M. Thourt mad to say it. Is not thj master with him?who, weret so, would have informd for preparation. Attendant. So please you, it is true ; our thane is coming. Oneof my fellows had the speed of him; who, almost dead for breath,had sca

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Shakespeare as a physicianComprising every word which in any way relates to medicine, surgery or obstetrics, found in the complete works of that writer, with criticisms and comparison of the same with the medical thoughts of to-day . , as the following will show: (Enter an attendant.) Lady M. What is your tidings ? Attendant. The king comes here to-night. Lady M. Thourt mad to say it. Is not thj master with him?who, weret so, would have informd for preparation. Attendant. So please you, it is true ; our thane is coming. Oneof my fellows had the speed of him; who, almost dead for breath,had sca
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Image ID: 2ANHAEF
Shakespeare as a physicianComprising every word which in any way relates to medicine, surgery or obstetrics, found in the complete works of that writer, with criticisms and comparison of the same with the medical thoughts of to-day . , as the following will show: (Enter an attendant.) Lady M. What is your tidings ? Attendant. The king comes here to-night. Lady M. Thourt mad to say it. Is not thj master with him?who, weret so, would have informd for preparation. Attendant. So please you, it is true ; our thane is coming. Oneof my fellows had the speed of him; who, almost dead for breath,had scarcely more than would make up his message. Lady M. Give him tending; he brings great news. (Ex.attendant.) The raven himself is hoarse, that croaks the fatalentrance of Duncan under my battlements. Come, you spirits 82 SHAKESPEARE AS A PHYSICIAN. that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, and fill me, from thecrown to the toe, top-full of direst cruelty; make thick my bloodstop up th access and passage to remorse; that no compunctiousvisitings of nature shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace betweenth effect and it. C*ome to my womans breasts, and take my milkfor gall, you murdering ministers, wherever in your sightless sub-. stances you wait on natures mischief. Come, thick night, and pallthee in the dunnest smoke of hell, that my keen knife see not thewound it makes, nor heaven peep through the blankness of thedark to cry, Hold, hold! Of this kind of cases we find ample records. I will quote fromDeboismont: Dom. Duhaget was of a good family in Gascony;he had been a captain in the infantry for twenty years ; I neverknew any one possessing any more amiability or piety. We had, he related, a friar at , where I was before I came to Pierre Chdtel, of a melancholy disposition and a gloomy character, whowas known to be a somnambulist. Sometimes, during the parox-ysms, he would leave his cell, and re-enter it alone ; at others, hewould lose himself, and have to be brought back. rsYc

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