Shakespeare as a physicianComprising every word which in any way relates to medicine, surgery or obstetrics, found in the complete works of that writer, with criticisms and comparison of the same with the medical thoughts of to-day . ; and the would-be reformers in the profession—those who are loud mouthed and boisterous in their clamor for ahigher standard of medical education, are the willing agents ofthese mountebanks in endangering the lives of helpless and unsus-pecting women and children. The people should see to it that suchlaws are removed from the statute books of the state. This rece

- Image ID: 2ANH655
Shakespeare as a physicianComprising every word which in any way relates to medicine, surgery or obstetrics, found in the complete works of that writer, with criticisms and comparison of the same with the medical thoughts of to-day . ; and the would-be reformers in the profession—those who are loud mouthed and boisterous in their clamor for ahigher standard of medical education, are the willing agents ofthese mountebanks in endangering the lives of helpless and unsus-pecting women and children. The people should see to it that suchlaws are removed from the statute books of the state. This rece
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Image ID: 2ANH655
Shakespeare as a physicianComprising every word which in any way relates to medicine, surgery or obstetrics, found in the complete works of that writer, with criticisms and comparison of the same with the medical thoughts of to-day . ; and the would-be reformers in the profession—those who are loud mouthed and boisterous in their clamor for ahigher standard of medical education, are the willing agents ofthese mountebanks in endangering the lives of helpless and unsus-pecting women and children. The people should see to it that suchlaws are removed from the statute books of the state. This recentmedical legislation in the various states is in the interest of designingcliques, and the hands of those with whom the power for the executionof the laws has been placed have never been raised a single timeagainst quackery,—but, on the contrary, have smote none but legiti-mate practitioners. [^ The licence law mentioned above is, to the practice of medicine,what the high licence law is to the dram shops—places a mo- CHIRURGERT. 211 nopoly of the itinerant medicine business in the hands of him whohas money, but summarily stops the wheels of progress of theimpecunious and less fortunate quack. I am not aware of any case. I have my licence from the State Board of Health, and here is your medicine. yet where any one has taken out the hundred dollar licence, but ifany do not avail themselves of the opportunity to revel in the bene-fits of a rich monopoly, it is certainly no fault of the law. CHAPTER IX MISCELLANEOUS. A vile caricature—The Huncliback—Now is the winter of my discontent—Listening to the whispers of Vanity—111 be at charge for a looking-glass—Troublous dreams—Sleep that knits up the raveled sleeve—Our life is two-old—Sleep hath its own world—From Byron —Neuralgia—No guaranty oftruth—Kiot—Position in sea-sickness — Old quarantine regulations — Theplague—From the cradle to the grave—Characteristics of senility—Take aman of honor

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