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. Scientific American Volume 86 Number 14 (April 1902) . selected which had but a very littis honeyin it. A large hole was made in this, which the beereturning with the honey certainly noticed, for shewent down to the bottom of her cell, and not onlyexamined the aperture carefully, but felt its edgeswith her antennae and pushed them through it. Didshe then, as might naturally be supposed, stop it up?Not at all. To do so would be to prove false to allthe traditions of her race—be a departure from theimmemorial usages of the Chalicodomians, and intro-duce a new and a disturbing element into the

. Scientific American Volume 86 Number 14 (April 1902) . selected which had but a very littis honeyin it. A large hole was made in this, which the beereturning with the honey certainly noticed, for shewent down to the bottom of her cell, and not onlyexamined the aperture carefully, but felt its edgeswith her antennae and pushed them through it. Didshe then, as might naturally be supposed, stop it up?Not at all. To do so would be to prove false to allthe traditions of her race—be a departure from theimmemorial usages of the Chalicodomians, and intro-duce a new and a disturbing element into the Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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2CDDKB2

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7.1 MB (598.4 KB Compressed download)

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1453 x 1719 px | 24.6 x 29.1 cm | 9.7 x 11.5 inches | 150dpi

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. Scientific American Volume 86 Number 14 (April 1902) . selected which had but a very littis honeyin it. A large hole was made in this, which the beereturning with the honey certainly noticed, for shewent down to the bottom of her cell, and not onlyexamined the aperture carefully, but felt its edgeswith her antennae and pushed them through it. Didshe then, as might naturally be supposed, stop it up?Not at all. To do so would be to prove false to allthe traditions of her race—be a departure from theimmemorial usages of the Chalicodomians, and intro-duce a new and a disturbing element into the ancientand honorable order of mason bees. However this is, the poor, devoted creature went onemptying into this vessel load after load of honey,which, as a matter of course, escaped at the bottomas fast as she emptied it at the top. All of one long,hot summer afternoon did she labor at this bootlesstask, and began again next morning. At last, when,regardless of the result, she had performed her pre-scribed duty in the prescribed manner, made the cus-. THE PLANT RAFFLESIA ARNOLDI, GIVING OUT THE SMELL OFTAINTED BEEF, UPON WHICH FLIES LAY THEIR EGGS. 242 Scientific American. April 5, 1902. tomary amount of journeys and supplied the usualamount of honey, she conscientiously laid her eggand closed up the empty cell. A detail of her work shows its absolutely auto-matic character. When the bee brings provisionsto add to the stock it has already collected she carriesboth honey and pollen; in order to deliver these shebegins by going head first into the cell and disgorgingthe honey; then, coming out, she turns around andbacks into the cell, and brushes and scrapes off withher hind legs the pollen, quantities of which adhereto the hairs that grow upon the under surface of herbody. If, after the honey has been discharged, thebee is interrupted in her work, induced to get upona straw and then removed a short distance, she re-turns as soon as she can to complete her task; butinstead of g

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