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. Scientific American Volume 86 Number 13 (March 1902). machine. An evidence of the practicability of the Turner run-about is given in the fact that the original vehicle,constructed four years ago, is still in daily use on thestreets of the Quaker City. Weighing but 400 pounds,it is yet so constructed as to safely carry two passen-gers over ordinary American roads with entire safety,its low running gear (but 20 inches from the ground)obviating the necessity of equipping the vehicle witha step. It has a speed range of from five to twentymiles an hour, while its tanks, with five gallons storagec

. Scientific American Volume 86 Number 13 (March 1902). machine. An evidence of the practicability of the Turner run-about is given in the fact that the original vehicle,constructed four years ago, is still in daily use on thestreets of the Quaker City. Weighing but 400 pounds,it is yet so constructed as to safely carry two passen-gers over ordinary American roads with entire safety,its low running gear (but 20 inches from the ground)obviating the necessity of equipping the vehicle witha step. It has a speed range of from five to twentymiles an hour, while its tanks, with five gallons storagec Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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2CEWBXC

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1790 x 1396 px | 30.3 x 23.6 cm | 11.9 x 9.3 inches | 150dpi

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. Scientific American Volume 86 Number 13 (March 1902). machine. An evidence of the practicability of the Turner run-about is given in the fact that the original vehicle,constructed four years ago, is still in daily use on thestreets of the Quaker City. Weighing but 400 pounds,it is yet so constructed as to safely carry two passen-gers over ordinary American roads with entire safety,its low running gear (but 20 inches from the ground)obviating the necessity of equipping the vehicle witha step. It has a speed range of from five to twentymiles an hour, while its tanks, with five gallons storagecapacity, have proven sufficient for the round tripfrom Philadelphia to Atlantic City (about 120 miles)in the actual running time of but a trifle over sixhours. This amount of fuel costs but fifty cents, andtwo passengers occupied the vehicle during the trip. The starting, stopping and braking are all done withthe one lever (with an additional foot brake). Mr.Turner is now engaged in perfecting a device bywhich the engine may be started from the seat.. Automobile Storage and Repair Facilities. The proper storing of automobiles, with all thatthis implies in the way of taking constant and in-telligent care of the machine, and the establishmentof efficient repair shops, still remain in a very unsat-isfactory condition, despite some commendable enter-prise in certain quarters. The manufacturers ofmotor vehicles are well aware that a great manypeople are deterred from buying machines because ofthe lack of repair shops able to do good, responsiblework. Chauffeurs of extended experience areconstantly complaining of the varying gradeof the liquid fuel which they pick up alongtheir touring routes, and those who dependon electricity argue that they are constantlyat odds to obtain a uniformly satisfactorycharging of the batteries. Such complaintsare usually well justified. Instead of dis-solving their usefulness in experience meet-ings and festive entertainments, the automo-bile clubs migh

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