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. Report on the injurious and other insects of the State of New York. same whichwere thrown off at their change to the pupal stage. At this time someof the cocoons, if not crushed, should have contained living pupae. An European Insect. The insect was described by Fabricius over a hundred years agofrom European examples as Phalcena costalis. It has been referred to thegenus Pyralis by our more recent writers. For a long time it was knownas Asopia costalis in this country, while in Europe, Pyralis costalis appearsto have been preferred by most writers; Humphreys, however, in his Genera of Briti

. Report on the injurious and other insects of the State of New York. same whichwere thrown off at their change to the pupal stage. At this time someof the cocoons, if not crushed, should have contained living pupae. An European Insect. The insect was described by Fabricius over a hundred years agofrom European examples as Phalcena costalis. It has been referred to thegenus Pyralis by our more recent writers. For a long time it was knownas Asopia costalis in this country, while in Europe, Pyralis costalis appearsto have been preferred by most writers; Humphreys, however, in his Genera of Briti Stock Photo
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1698 x 1471 px | 28.8 x 24.9 cm | 11.3 x 9.8 inches | 150dpi

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. Report on the injurious and other insects of the State of New York. same whichwere thrown off at their change to the pupal stage. At this time someof the cocoons, if not crushed, should have contained living pupae. An European Insect. The insect was described by Fabricius over a hundred years agofrom European examples as Phalcena costalis. It has been referred to thegenus Pyralis by our more recent writers. For a long time it was knownas Asopia costalis in this country, while in Europe, Pyralis costalis appearsto have been preferred by most writers; Humphreys, however, in his Genera of British Moths, referred the insect to the genus Hypsopygea. Characters of the Pyralidae. The family of Pyralidce, to which this insect belongs, comprises a largenumber of moths of small or medium size, which may often be recognizedby their long and slender legs, slender bodies, and wings arranged whenat rest in a triangle like the Greek letter delta. Many of the specieshaunt meadows and grassy places, where they are frequently quite in-jurious. 148 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM. Description of Moth and Larva.The moth is about three-fourths of an inch in spread of wings, of areddish-brown or purplish color. Its front wings are marked with two yellow spots on their front margin,the outer one of which is thelarger, and with two faint yellowlines extending from these to theinner margin ; the hind wingsare crossed by two wavy yellowishlines. The fringes of both pairsare long, with a silken luster andare golden-yellow in color: thislast feature has given the moth inEurope the pretty popular name;e of the Gold-Fringe. As the moth, Pyralis costalis/ 1,2, larva; 3, cocoon; ;r,cp„t ,,,i!1 Cplflnn, UA mf>r wuh 1™ 4,pupa; 5, 6, moth; 7, larva within the web. insect will seldom De met witn Dy(From Riley.) farmers except in its caterpillar form, it may be serviceable to quote its description as given by Mr. Walsh, who was the first to describe it: Length half an inch ; diameter, 0.07 inch, taperin