Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time (1897) (1
RMH2D8R4Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time (1897) (1
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time.
RM2AFJ0A5. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time.
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Amoeba. Actinophrys.From original sketches..
RM2AFJ5MG. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Amoeba. Actinophrys.From original sketches..
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Canals of Eozoon. (After Mobius.) Finer Canals of Eozoon. (After Mobius.
RM2AFJ74W. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Canals of Eozoon. (After Mobius.) Finer Canals of Eozoon. (After Mobius.
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Fig. 52.—Acervuline Variety of Eozoon, Cote St. Pierre. (a) General form, half natural size. (3) Portion of cellular interior, magnified,showing the course of the tubuli..
RM2AFJ3FE. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Fig. 52.—Acervuline Variety of Eozoon, Cote St. Pierre. (a) General form, half natural size. (3) Portion of cellular interior, magnified,showing the course of the tubuli..
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Fig. 52.—Acervuline Variety of Eozoon, Cote St. Pierre. (a) General form, half natural size. (3) Portion of cellular interior, magnified,showing the course of the tubuli.
RM2AFJ3JR. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Fig. 52.—Acervuline Variety of Eozoon, Cote St. Pierre. (a) General form, half natural size. (3) Portion of cellular interior, magnified,showing the course of the tubuli.
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Fig. 41.—Comparison of Tubulate Wall and Prisms of Chrysotile inperspective. lation may have been misled by chrysotile veinswhen these fringe the laminae. Mobius, for instance,figures the true and false structure as if they werethe same. Protest should here be made against that mode.
RM2AFJ7A4. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. Fig. 41.—Comparison of Tubulate Wall and Prisms of Chrysotile inperspective. lation may have been misled by chrysotile veinswhen these fringe the laminae. Mobius, for instance,figures the true and false structure as if they werethe same. Protest should here be made against that mode.
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. various associatedminerals. An extensive series of notes and cameratracings were made of all the appearances observed ;and of some of the more important structuresbeautiful drawings were executed by the late Mr.H. S. Smith, the then palaeontological draughtsmanof the Survey. The result of the whole investigationwas a firm conviction that the structure was organicand probably foraminiferal, and that it could bedistinguished from any merely mineral or crystallineforms occurring in these or other limestones. At this stag
RM2AFJARR. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. various associatedminerals. An extensive series of notes and cameratracings were made of all the appearances observed ;and of some of the more important structuresbeautiful drawings were executed by the late Mr.H. S. Smith, the then palaeontological draughtsmanof the Survey. The result of the whole investigationwas a firm conviction that the structure was organicand probably foraminiferal, and that it could bedistinguished from any merely mineral or crystallineforms occurring in these or other limestones. At this stag
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. e we can fullyrealize the forms and structures of the animals towhich they belonged. We may pause here, however, to remark thatneither the geographical nor climatal conditions ofthe earth at this early time were similar to thesewith which we are now familiar. The marineanimals of the Cambrian have left their remainsin beds of sediment, which now constitute rocksforming parts of our continents remote from thesea, and much elevated above its level, showingthat large areas, then under the ocean, are nowdry land ; while t
RM2AFK1TD. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. e we can fullyrealize the forms and structures of the animals towhich they belonged. We may pause here, however, to remark thatneither the geographical nor climatal conditions ofthe earth at this early time were similar to thesewith which we are now familiar. The marineanimals of the Cambrian have left their remainsin beds of sediment, which now constitute rocksforming parts of our continents remote from thesea, and much elevated above its level, showingthat large areas, then under the ocean, are nowdry land ; while t
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. one ofthe calcite layers. Here was evidence, not only thatthe calcite layers represented the true skeleton of thefossil, but also of its affinities with the Foraminifera,whose tubulated supplemental skeleton, as describedand figured by Dr. Carpenter, and represented inspecimens in my collection presented by him, wasevidently of the same type with that preserved in thecanals of these ancient fossils. Fig. 28 is an accuraterepresentation of the first seen group of canals pene-trated by serpentine. On showing the structu
RM2AFJB3A. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. one ofthe calcite layers. Here was evidence, not only thatthe calcite layers represented the true skeleton of thefossil, but also of its affinities with the Foraminifera,whose tubulated supplemental skeleton, as describedand figured by Dr. Carpenter, and represented inspecimens in my collection presented by him, wasevidently of the same type with that preserved in thecanals of these ancient fossils. Fig. 28 is an accuraterepresentation of the first seen group of canals pene-trated by serpentine. On showing the structu
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. o the question, exceptthat a creative power must have intervened ; butin what manner we know not. That this actuallyoccurred, we can, however, be assured by the nextsucceeding geological formation. We have seenthat the granitic and gneissic ridges could furnishpebbles, sand, and clay, and these once depositedin the sea-bottom could be hardened into con-glomerate, sandstone and slate. But beside thesewe have in the next succeeding or Upper Lauren-tian formation rocks of a very different character.We have great beds of
RM2AFJEAN. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. o the question, exceptthat a creative power must have intervened ; butin what manner we know not. That this actuallyoccurred, we can, however, be assured by the nextsucceeding geological formation. We have seenthat the granitic and gneissic ridges could furnishpebbles, sand, and clay, and these once depositedin the sea-bottom could be hardened into con-glomerate, sandstone and slate. But beside thesewe have in the next succeeding or Upper Lauren-tian formation rocks of a very different character.We have great beds of
. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. aphitic matter withorganic limestone, beds of iron ore, and metallicsulphides, greatly strengthens the probability of itsvegetable origin ; fifthly, that when we considerthe immense thickness and extent of the Eozoonaland graphitic limestones and iron ore deposits ofthe Laurentian, if we admit the organic origin ofthe limestone and graphite, we must be preparedto believe that the life of that early period, thoughit may have existed under low forms, was mostcopiously developed, and that it equalled, perhapssurpassed, i
RM2AFJDT7. Relics of primeval life, beginning of life in the dawn of geological time. aphitic matter withorganic limestone, beds of iron ore, and metallicsulphides, greatly strengthens the probability of itsvegetable origin ; fifthly, that when we considerthe immense thickness and extent of the Eozoonaland graphitic limestones and iron ore deposits ofthe Laurentian, if we admit the organic origin ofthe limestone and graphite, we must be preparedto believe that the life of that early period, thoughit may have existed under low forms, was mostcopiously developed, and that it equalled, perhapssurpassed, i