. Readings in evolution, genetics, and eugenics. Evolution; Heredity; Eugenics. EVIDENCES FROM MORPHOLOGY 141 changed conditions of life, an organ which was previously useful becomes useless, it will be suffered to dwindle away in successive generations, under the influence of certain natural causes which we shall have to consider in future chapters. On the other hand, the theory of special creation can only maintain that these rudiments are formed for the sake of adhering to an ideal type. Now, here again the former theory appears to be triumphant over the latter; for, without waiting to disp

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. Readings in evolution, genetics, and eugenics. Evolution; Heredity; Eugenics. EVIDENCES FROM MORPHOLOGY 141 changed conditions of life, an organ which was previously useful becomes useless, it will be suffered to dwindle away in successive generations, under the influence of certain natural causes which we shall have to consider in future chapters. On the other hand, the theory of special creation can only maintain that these rudiments are formed for the sake of adhering to an ideal type. Now, here again the former theory appears to be triumphant over the latter; for, without waiting to disp
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Image ID: PG1F6X
. Readings in evolution, genetics, and eugenics. Evolution; Heredity; Eugenics. EVIDENCES FROM MORPHOLOGY 141 changed conditions of life, an organ which was previously useful becomes useless, it will be suffered to dwindle away in successive generations, under the influence of certain natural causes which we shall have to consider in future chapters. On the other hand, the theory of special creation can only maintain that these rudiments are formed for the sake of adhering to an ideal type. Now, here again the former theory appears to be triumphant over the latter; for, without waiting to dispute the wisdom of making dwarfed and useless structures merely for the whimsical motive assigned, surely if such a. Kmf^rAfiy HiHB-i-iiiiBi *. MciiT, B. to«/My riimimtrnil or Fig. 17.—Rudimentary or vestigial hind limbs of python, as exhibited in the skeleton and on the external surface of the animal. Drawn from nature, \ nat. size. (From Romanes!) method were adopted in so many cases, we should expect that in con- sistency it would be adopted in all cases. This reasonable expectation, however, is far from being realized. We have already seen that in niunberless cases, such as that of the fore-limbs of serpents, no vestige of a rudiment is present. But the vacillating policy in the matter of rudiments does not end here; for it is shown in a still more aggravated form where within the limits of the same natural groups of organisms a rudiment is sometimes present and sometimes absent. For instance, although in nearly all the numerous species of snakes there are no vestiges of limbs, in the Python we find very tiny rudiments of the hind-limbs (Fig. 17). Now, is it a worthy conception of Deity that, while neglecting to maintain his unity of ideal in the case of. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work..

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