Rambles and studies in Greece . which will bedescribed hereafter, and another at Athens in theTheseon—which are plainly of the same epochand style of art. The Athenian one (cf. Figure)is inscribed as the stele of Aristion, and as thework of Aristocles,1 doubtless an artist known ascontemporary with those who fought at the battle ofMarathon. Thus we obtain a very good clue tothe date at which this art flourished. There is alsothe head of a similar figure, with the hair long,and fastened in a knot behind, and with a discusraised above the shoulder, so as to look like animbus round the head, whic

Rambles and studies in Greece . which will bedescribed hereafter, and another at Athens in theTheseon—which are plainly of the same epochand style of art. The Athenian one (cf. Figure)is inscribed as the stele of Aristion, and as thework of Aristocles,1 doubtless an artist known ascontemporary with those who fought at the battle ofMarathon. Thus we obtain a very good clue tothe date at which this art flourished. There is alsothe head of a similar figure, with the hair long,and fastened in a knot behind, and with a discusraised above the shoulder, so as to look like animbus round the head, whic Stock Photo
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Rambles and studies in Greece . which will bedescribed hereafter, and another at Athens in theTheseon—which are plainly of the same epochand style of art. The Athenian one (cf. Figure)is inscribed as the stele of Aristion, and as thework of Aristocles, 1 doubtless an artist known ascontemporary with those who fought at the battle ofMarathon. Thus we obtain a very good clue tothe date at which this art flourished. There is alsothe head of a similar figure, with the hair long, and fastened in a knot behind, and with a discusraised above the shoulder, so as to look like animbus round the head, which is one of the mostinteresting objects in the Varvakion. But of therest the pedestal only is preserved. Any impartialobserver will see in these figures strong traces ofthe influence of Asiatic style. This influence seemsabout as certain, and almost as much disputed, as the Egyptian influences on the Doric style ofarchitecture. To an unbiassed observer these influ- 1 Ari-(.ion is also mentioned among the artists of the period.. in.] A TURNS—THE MUSK I MS. 65 ences speak so plainly, that, in the absence of strictdemonstration to the contrary, one feels bound toadmit them—the more so, as we know that theGreeks, like all other people of genius, were everready and anxious to borrow from others. Itshould be often repeated, because it is usuallyignored, that it is a most original gift to know howto borrow; and that those only who feel wantingin originality are anxious to assert it. Thus theRomans, who borrowed without assimilating, arealways asserting their originality; the Greeks, whoborrowed more and better, because they made whatthey borrowed their own, never care to do so. Thehackneyed parallel of Shakspeare will occur to all.Unfortunately, the museums of Athens showus hardly any examples of the transition state ofart between this and the perfect work of Phidiasschool. The ^Eginetan marbles are less developedthan Phidias work ; but from the relief of Aristion, and the Theseus

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