. Prisoners of war and military prisons; personal narratives of experience in the prisons at Richmond, Danville, Macon, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Charleston, and Columbia ... with a list of officers who were prisoners of war from January 1, 1864 . private property, bought andpaid for by each man, and by all law and decency shouldhave been preserved to him without stipulation; but suchwas not generally the case. It was a matter of the great-est surprise to us that the rebel authorities respectedthese terms after they had been made with them, yet bysome oversight doubtless on their part t

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. Prisoners of war and military prisons; personal narratives of experience in the prisons at Richmond, Danville, Macon, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Charleston, and Columbia ... with a list of officers who were prisoners of war from January 1, 1864 . private property, bought andpaid for by each man, and by all law and decency shouldhave been preserved to him without stipulation; but suchwas not generally the case. It was a matter of the great-est surprise to us that the rebel authorities respectedthese terms after they had been made with them, yet bysome oversight doubtless on their part t Stock Photo
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. Prisoners of war and military prisons; personal narratives of experience in the prisons at Richmond, Danville, Macon, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Charleston, and Columbia ... with a list of officers who were prisoners of war from January 1, 1864 . private property, bought andpaid for by each man, and by all law and decency shouldhave been preserved to him without stipulation; but suchwas not generally the case. It was a matter of the great-est surprise to us that the rebel authorities respectedthese terms after they had been made with them, yet bysome oversight doubtless on their part t
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. Prisoners of war and military prisons; personal narratives of experience in the prisons at Richmond, Danville, Macon, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Charleston, and Columbia ... with a list of officers who were prisoners of war from January 1, 1864 . private property, bought andpaid for by each man, and by all law and decency shouldhave been preserved to him without stipulation; but suchwas not generally the case. It was a matter of the great-est surprise to us that the rebel authorities respectedthese terms after they had been made with them, yet bysome oversight doubtless on their part they were re-spected; but they knew full well that such articles ascould be of use to their army would just as surely findtheir way ultimately in their possession, for trifling re-turns, as if they had taken them by force. A few daysbefore the capture of these men, they had been enlistedas veterans, and received payas such. Each man had, con-sequently, quite a large amountof money—some as many asthree hundred dollai^s—andnearly every one had an over-coat, extra pants, shirts, draw-ers, and blankets. It w^aspleasant to look upon them,to see their noble forms ar-jrayed in the comfortable uni-forms of our loved country; but, while we were glad to. 236 Prisoners of War. find them so well provided with materials for their com-fort, we were by no means rejoiced to see them amongus, for we knew too well by our own experience that theirpresent good cheer could not last. They were, as a gen-eral thing, noble-minded and intelligent, with a high senseof honor and integrity; men whose associations had evi-dently been of the best character; they had enlisted andperiled their lives because they felt it to be their duty.It was sad to think how soon they would be brought low,their courage gone, and squalid want and misery claimthem for their victims. They brought us some news aboutexchange, and like all prisoners who had been but re-cently captured, indulged in flattering anticipations ofsp

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