. Principles and practice of poultry culture . Poultry. 420 POULTRY CULTURE Jubilee of Queen Victoria, — hence the name. The variety is said to have been produced in the same way as the Buff Orpington stock of the orig- inator, but with speckled in- stead of Dark Dorkings. The color is a mixture of black, brown, and white (such as has always occurred occasionally in flocks of mixed colors); this variety was bred with the pur- pose of securing uniform dis- tribution of the several colors, and a more pleasing eifect than a nondescript pattern. Spangled Orpingtons (single- and rose-comb) are blac

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Image ID: PG1EXC
. Principles and practice of poultry culture . Poultry. 420 POULTRY CULTURE Jubilee of Queen Victoria, — hence the name. The variety is said to have been produced in the same way as the Buff Orpington stock of the orig- inator, but with speckled in- stead of Dark Dorkings. The color is a mixture of black, brown, and white (such as has always occurred occasionally in flocks of mixed colors); this variety was bred with the pur- pose of securing uniform dis- tribution of the several colors, and a more pleasing eifect than a nondescript pattern. Spangled Orpingtons (single- and rose-comb) are black-and- white mottled fowls said by the originator to have been produced by a mingling of Dark Dork- ing, Barred Plymouth Rock, and Silver Spangled Hamburg; they are declared by other English authorities to be identi- cal with the Speckled Sussex. Spangled Orpingtons were introduced to the pub- lic in 1899.. Fig. 436. Single-Combed Buff Orpington cock, a very meaty specimen ^ Note. These six breeds (the Plymouth Rock, Java, Wyandotte, Rhode Island Red, Buckeye, and Orpington), with some thirty varieties and subvarieties, furnish, in the standard size, weight, and shape of body of each, all gradations be- tween the Leghorn laying type and the Asiatic meat type ; in combs, all the principal styles; in colors and color patterns, almost all the distinct types found in other classes of fowls. Taking any one of these varieties, as the different stocks and as the birds in the flocks run, we find in it specimens of most (sometimes all) of the other types, and all the intermediate sizes and forms. Not only so, ^ Photographs, Figs. 436-439 from owner, J. W. Clark, Cainsville, Ontario.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Robinson, John H. (John Henry), 1863-1935. Boston ; New York : Ginn and Company

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