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Portrait of John Willis Menard, circa 1870 - Photograph shows a head-and-shoulders portrait of political activist and author John Willis Menard (1838-1893). In 1868 Menard became the first African American elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana's 2nd Congressional District. The election results were contested by his opponent, Caleb S. Hunt, resulting in Congress denying Menard his seat. However, on February 27, 1869, Menard did become the first African American to address the chamber. When the House Committee on Elections could not make a final determination on the electio

Portrait of John Willis Menard, circa 1870 - Photograph shows a head-and-shoulders portrait of political activist and author John Willis Menard (1838-1893). In 1868 Menard became the first African American elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana's 2nd Congressional District. The election results were contested by his opponent, Caleb S. Hunt, resulting in Congress denying Menard his seat. However, on February 27, 1869, Menard did become the first African American to address the chamber. When the House Committee on Elections could not make a final determination on the electio Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Niday Picture Library / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2GE7C34

File size:

51.4 MB (1.4 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

3381 x 5311 px | 28.6 x 45 cm | 11.3 x 17.7 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

21 November 2017

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Portrait of John Willis Menard, circa 1870 - Photograph shows a head-and-shoulders portrait of political activist and author John Willis Menard (1838-1893). In 1868 Menard became the first African American elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana's 2nd Congressional District. The election results were contested by his opponent, Caleb S. Hunt, resulting in Congress denying Menard his seat. However, on February 27, 1869, Menard did become the first African American to address the chamber. When the House Committee on Elections could not make a final determination on the election challenge, the case went before the entire House of Representatives who, on February 27, 1869 suspended its rules to allow both Menard and Hunt to address the chamber. Only Menard spoke. After debating the issue, neither Menard nor Hunt could gain enough support to be seated. The vote for Hunt was 41 in favor to 137 against. For Menard, it was 57 in favor and 130 against. Congressman and future president James A. Garfield, is reputed to have said that "'it was too early" for an African American to be admitted to Congress.

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