. Popular official guide to the New York zoological park . Zoos. NEW VORK ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 133. MUTE AND TRUMPETER SWANS. SECTION II.—BIRDS. THE GOOSE AVIARY, No. 3. There are no birds which take more kindly to captivity, or which better repay their keep and their keepers, than the ducks, geese, swans and pelicans. The only drawback to the maintenance of large collections of these birds in this latitude is the annual struggle with our arctic winter. On account of the fierce winter storms to which we must pay tribute, many species of swimming birds require to be taken out of their aviary, and h

. Popular official guide to the New York zoological park . Zoos. NEW VORK ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 133. MUTE AND TRUMPETER SWANS. SECTION II.—BIRDS. THE GOOSE AVIARY, No. 3. There are no birds which take more kindly to captivity, or which better repay their keep and their keepers, than the ducks, geese, swans and pelicans. The only drawback to the maintenance of large collections of these birds in this latitude is the annual struggle with our arctic winter. On account of the fierce winter storms to which we must pay tribute, many species of swimming birds require to be taken out of their aviary, and h Stock Photo
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. Popular official guide to the New York zoological park . Zoos. NEW VORK ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 133. MUTE AND TRUMPETER SWANS. SECTION II.—BIRDS. THE GOOSE AVIARY, No. 3. There are no birds which take more kindly to captivity, or which better repay their keep and their keepers, than the ducks, geese, swans and pelicans. The only drawback to the maintenance of large collections of these birds in this latitude is the annual struggle with our arctic winter. On account of the fierce winter storms to which we must pay tribute, many species of swimming birds require to be taken out of their aviary, and housed in sheltered buildings, with moderate warmth. For this reason the pelicans, tree-ducks of all species, and all species from the tropics, must neces- sarily be absent in winter from their summer quarters. For the accommodation of a large, systematic collection of wild geese, an aviary two hundred and fifty feet long by one hundred and forty-three feet in width has been con- structed in the north end of Bird Valley. To secure as much space as possible, the entire width of the open valley has been taken into the enclosure. The Goose Aviary consists of a pond containing three islands, two of which are subdivided by low fences of wire netting into tAvelve separate enclosures. The collection of geese has become so large and important the original Duck. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. New York Zoological Park; Hornaday, William Temple, 1854-1937; New York Zoological Society. New York : New York zoological Society

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