. Popular official guide to the New York Zoological Park. New York Zoological Park. NEW YOHK ZUOLOGICAL TAI^K. 55. The Dromedary, or Single-Humped Camel, (Camehts dro- medarius), is a smaller animal than the preceding, of lighter build, and therefore capable of much more speed in travel- ling. This siDceies never is clothed with long hair. Next to the Camel House and corrals is the installation for the nearest relatives of those species,—the Llamas, Gua- nacos and other cameloids of South America. THE LLAMA HOUSE, No. 38. Collection of Cameloids was presented by Mr. Robert S. Brewster-. The ar

. Popular official guide to the New York Zoological Park. New York Zoological Park. NEW YOHK ZUOLOGICAL TAI^K. 55. The Dromedary, or Single-Humped Camel, (Camehts dro- medarius), is a smaller animal than the preceding, of lighter build, and therefore capable of much more speed in travel- ling. This siDceies never is clothed with long hair. Next to the Camel House and corrals is the installation for the nearest relatives of those species,—the Llamas, Gua- nacos and other cameloids of South America. THE LLAMA HOUSE, No. 38. Collection of Cameloids was presented by Mr. Robert S. Brewster-. The ar Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

PG287G

File size:

7.1 MB (420.6 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1944 x 1285 px | 32.9 x 21.8 cm | 13 x 8.6 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. Popular official guide to the New York Zoological Park. New York Zoological Park. NEW YOHK ZUOLOGICAL TAI^K. 55. The Dromedary, or Single-Humped Camel, (Camehts dro- medarius), is a smaller animal than the preceding, of lighter build, and therefore capable of much more speed in travel- ling. This siDceies never is clothed with long hair. Next to the Camel House and corrals is the installation for the nearest relatives of those species, —the Llamas, Gua- nacos and other cameloids of South America. THE LLAMA HOUSE, No. 38. Collection of Cameloids was presented by Mr. Robert S. Brewster-. The arid regions of South America are inhabited by four species of long-necked, long-haired, soft-footed animals, so closely related to the camels of the Old World that they are called cameloids. There are four species. The llama and alpaca are in a state of domestication, and are supposed to have been derived from the wild guanaco and vieunia. All of them might almost be described as small-sized, hump- less camels; and their tempers and mental traits are as odd as their forms. The ordinary cameloid is a quiet and inoffensive creature; but the exception is a rogue of rogues. It will bite with the persistence of a buU-dog, and with its massive, chisel-like. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. New York Zoological Park; Hornaday, William Temple, 1854-1937; New York Zoological Society. New York New York Zoological Society

Save up to 70% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts

Search stock photos by tags