. Popular official guide to the New York Zoological Park. New York Zoological Park. LiTTi^E; iiUOWN CKANE. DEMOISELLE CRANE. the eggs are incubated by the heat of the sun and the fer- mentation of the mass. When hatched, the young chicks are able to fly. THE CRANES. At present the Cranes of the Zoological Park are divided between the Ostrich Honse and the Aquatic Bird House, and their environs. In summer there are exhibits of these birds in the outdoor yards adjacent to each of those buildings. Recently, a nnmber of species have been acclimatized in the Crane Paddock, and are to be seen there

- Image ID: RDA9W7
. Popular official guide to the New York Zoological Park. New York Zoological Park. LiTTi^E; iiUOWN CKANE. DEMOISELLE CRANE. the eggs are incubated by the heat of the sun and the fer- mentation of the mass. When hatched, the young chicks are able to fly. THE CRANES. At present the Cranes of the Zoological Park are divided between the Ostrich Honse and the Aquatic Bird House, and their environs. In summer there are exhibits of these birds in the outdoor yards adjacent to each of those buildings. Recently, a nnmber of species have been acclimatized in the Crane Paddock, and are to be seen there
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDA9W7
. Popular official guide to the New York Zoological Park. New York Zoological Park. LiTTi^E; iiUOWN CKANE. DEMOISELLE CRANE. the eggs are incubated by the heat of the sun and the fer- mentation of the mass. When hatched, the young chicks are able to fly. THE CRANES. At present the Cranes of the Zoological Park are divided between the Ostrich Honse and the Aquatic Bird House, and their environs. In summer there are exhibits of these birds in the outdoor yards adjacent to each of those buildings. Recently, a nnmber of species have been acclimatized in the Crane Paddock, and are to be seen there winter and sum- The Whooping Crane, {Gnis auicricaiia), is the largest, the handsomest and the rarest crane species in America. Its great size and its pure-white plumage—except its primar- ies—render it con.spicuous from afar, and its voice will carry half a mile. The arched secondary wing feathers of the adult give the bird a verj'' jaunty appearance. This .species is so rare that thus far we have been able in eight years to secure only three specimens. The Whooping Crane nests in summer in the Arctic regions, but in winter it ranges as far south as Mexico. Our specimen.s of this bird will in summer be found in tlie large paddock immediately north of the Aquatic Bird House, with the next species. The Sandhill Crane, (Gnis mcxicaua). is smaller than the preceding species, more common, and is frequently seen in. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. New York Zoological Park; Hornaday, William Temple, 1854-1937; New York Zoological Society. New York New York Zoological Society

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