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. Popular history of the civil war . this year, asusual; but, when Abraham Lincoln received the election tothat office, the clamor which followed was any thing butsisterly. No sooner was the news sent over the telegraph-wires than South Carolina, always a Httle hot-tempered andwilful, flew into a rage. Every free State, excepting NewJersey, had given her voice for Mr. Lincoln; and even shegave him more than half her votes. For a great many years, almost all the years of theRepublic, the Southern States had exercised a powerfulinfluence in the government. Now, for the first time, theNorthern St

. Popular history of the civil war . this year, asusual; but, when Abraham Lincoln received the election tothat office, the clamor which followed was any thing butsisterly. No sooner was the news sent over the telegraph-wires than South Carolina, always a Httle hot-tempered andwilful, flew into a rage. Every free State, excepting NewJersey, had given her voice for Mr. Lincoln; and even shegave him more than half her votes. For a great many years, almost all the years of theRepublic, the Southern States had exercised a powerfulinfluence in the government. Now, for the first time, theNorthern St Stock Photo
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. Popular history of the civil war . this year, asusual; but, when Abraham Lincoln received the election tothat office, the clamor which followed was any thing butsisterly. No sooner was the news sent over the telegraph-wires than South Carolina, always a Httle hot-tempered andwilful, flew into a rage. Every free State, excepting NewJersey, had given her voice for Mr. Lincoln; and even shegave him more than half her votes. For a great many years, almost all the years of theRepublic, the Southern States had exercised a powerfulinfluence in the government. Now, for the first time, theNorthern States claimed the right to express an opinion;and South Carolina, for one, would not admit it, and so shedeclared herself out of the Union. The reason for this unhappy difference of opinion wasvery plain. The South wished, not only to hold slaves,which nobody expected to hinder, but, as we have alreadyseen, she wished to extend the system of slavery to otherStates and Territories. Mr. Lincoln earnestly opposed the idea of making new. PRESIDENT LINCOLN. i860.] a Family Quarrel. 21 slave States, and he had not hesitated to say so. Indeed,when he was nominated, or chosen, for the Repubhcan can-didate for President, that opinion was one of the planks ofthe platform, as politicians say, upon which he stood. South Carolina received the news of the election on the7th of November. Instead of mourning over the defeat ofher own candidate, she broke forth into shouts of rejoicing;for it gave her an excuse to do what she had long desired. Like a naughty child, that wont play unless it can al-ways have its own way, she took immediate steps to secedefrom the Union, and thus to become an independent State,flatly refusing to accept the decision of the polls. Charlestoninstantly presented a scene of the wildest excitement. Bellswere rung ; speeches were made ; and bonfires glowed : evenwomen paraded the streets, wearing secession colors andbadges. Urged on by the governor, himself a hearty sece5